Prevalence and clinical correlates of early repolarization and J wave in a large cohort of subjects without overt heart disease

Gaetano A. Lanza, Roberto Mollo, Alessandro Cosenza, Gaetano Pinnacchio, Giulia Careri, Marianna Laurito, Filippo Crea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Recent studies have suggested that early repolarization (ER) is associated with increased risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Early repolarization in these studies, however, was defined as J-wave (terminal QRS slurring or notching) or J-point elevation rather than typical ST-segment elevation (STE). Prevalence and characteristics of these different findings in the general population are poorly known. In this study, we assessed prevalence and correlates of STE typical of ER and of J wave in a large population of noncardiac subjects. Methods: We prospectively collected electrocardiograms of 4176 consecutive subjects without heart disease at our hospital. Results: Early repolarization was found in 84 subjects (2.0%) and J wave in 663 (15.9%). Among ER subjects, a J wave was present in 60 (71.4%). Variables independently associated with both ER and J wave included young age, male sex, and lower heart rate. There was no increased history of symptoms (palpitations and syncope) possibly related to arrhythmias in STE or J-wave subjects. Conclusions: Typical ER pattern and J wave are common in noncardiac subjects, particularly in young people, and are not associated with symptoms potentially related to arrhythmias.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)404-410
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Electrocardiology
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

Keywords

  • Early repolarization
  • J-wave
  • ST-segment elevation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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