Prevalence and histologic features of transfusion transmitted virus and hepatitis C virus coinfection in a group of HIV patients

R. Bruno, P. Sacchi, M. Debiaggi, S. F A Patruno, F. Zara, V. Ciappina, E. Brunetti, C. Filice, C. Zocchetti, E. Maffezzini, A. Pistorio, G. Filice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. A recently identified DNA transfusion-transmitted virus has been associated with post-transfusion non-A to G hepatitis. Aim. To determine the prevalence of transfusion-transmitted virus in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Its clinical role in the pathogenesis of liver disease was also evaluated in patients with transfusion-transmitted-virus hepatitis C virus coinfection compared with those with hepatitis C Virus infection alone. Patients and Methods. We evaluated 312 HIV-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients (225 males, 87 females). All underwent screening for transfusion-transmitted virus DNA using a nested polymerase chain reaction technique. In some transfusion transmitted virus-DNA positive patients, we performed a phylogenetic analysis. In 56 patients (20 transfusion-transmitted-virus-hepatitis C virus and 36 hepatitis C virus alone), liver biopsy was collected. Results. The prevalence of transfusion-transmitted virus was 113/312 (36%). The genotype distribution was similar to that reported in other studies. No difference in liver histology was found between the two groups. Conclusion. Transfusion-transmitted virus infection is common in human immunodeficiency virus patients. We found no histologic differences between liver biopsy specimens from patients coinfected with transfusion-transmitted virus plus hepatitis C virus compared with those infected with hepatitis C virus alone. Transfusion-transmitted virus is not clearly associated with a distinct liver injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)617-620
Number of pages4
JournalDigestive and Liver Disease
Volume32
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Torque teno virus
Coinfection
Hepacivirus
HIV
Virus Diseases
Liver
Biopsy
DNA Viruses
DNA
Hepatitis
Liver Diseases
Histology
Genotype

Keywords

  • Hepatitis
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Transfusion-transmitted virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Prevalence and histologic features of transfusion transmitted virus and hepatitis C virus coinfection in a group of HIV patients. / Bruno, R.; Sacchi, P.; Debiaggi, M.; Patruno, S. F A; Zara, F.; Ciappina, V.; Brunetti, E.; Filice, C.; Zocchetti, C.; Maffezzini, E.; Pistorio, A.; Filice, G.

In: Digestive and Liver Disease, Vol. 32, No. 7, 2000, p. 617-620.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background. A recently identified DNA transfusion-transmitted virus has been associated with post-transfusion non-A to G hepatitis. Aim. To determine the prevalence of transfusion-transmitted virus in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Its clinical role in the pathogenesis of liver disease was also evaluated in patients with transfusion-transmitted-virus hepatitis C virus coinfection compared with those with hepatitis C Virus infection alone. Patients and Methods. We evaluated 312 HIV-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients (225 males, 87 females). All underwent screening for transfusion-transmitted virus DNA using a nested polymerase chain reaction technique. In some transfusion transmitted virus-DNA positive patients, we performed a phylogenetic analysis. In 56 patients (20 transfusion-transmitted-virus-hepatitis C virus and 36 hepatitis C virus alone), liver biopsy was collected. Results. The prevalence of transfusion-transmitted virus was 113/312 (36{\%}). The genotype distribution was similar to that reported in other studies. No difference in liver histology was found between the two groups. Conclusion. Transfusion-transmitted virus infection is common in human immunodeficiency virus patients. We found no histologic differences between liver biopsy specimens from patients coinfected with transfusion-transmitted virus plus hepatitis C virus compared with those infected with hepatitis C virus alone. Transfusion-transmitted virus is not clearly associated with a distinct liver injury.",
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AU - Sacchi, P.

AU - Debiaggi, M.

AU - Patruno, S. F A

AU - Zara, F.

AU - Ciappina, V.

AU - Brunetti, E.

AU - Filice, C.

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AU - Maffezzini, E.

AU - Pistorio, A.

AU - Filice, G.

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