Prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of lower genital neoplasia in women with human immunodeficiency virus infection

A. Spinillo, P. Tenti, R. Zappatore, G. Barbarini, A. Maccabruni, L. Carratta, S. Guaschino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The prevalence of lower genital neoplasia and Human Papilloma-virus-related genital lesions were evaluated in a cohort of 75 women with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection at different stages of HIV disease. The overall rate of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in the group studied was 29.3% ( 22 75). Eight out of 10 high-grade CIN lesions contained 'high-risk' HPV-DNA 16 18 and/or 31/35/51 as demonstrated by 'in situ' hybridization with biotinylated probes. Vulvar and/or perianal condylomata were histologically diagnosed in 14 patients (18.7%); nine of these biopsies contained detectable HPV-DNA which was always related to HPV 6 11. The rate of high-grade CIN in symptomatic HIV-infected patients was 28% ( 7 25) as compared to 6% ( 3 50) of the other cases (P = 0.022). CD4 lymphocyte counts, white blood cell counts, CD4+ CD8+ cell ratio and percentage of CD4+ lymphocytes were lower in patients with high-grade CIN in comparison to the patients with negative colposcopical and/or cytological examination. After adequate standard treatment (cryotherapy, electrocauterization, cold-knife conization) only one case of CIN 2 recurred during the 2 years of follow-up period. The prevalence of lower genital neoplasia and HPV-related lesions among HIV-infected women is high and seems to correlate with the severity of HIV disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-241
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 28 1992

Keywords

  • Human immunodeficiency virus infection
  • Human papillomavirus infection
  • Lower genital neoplasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

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