Prevalence of HIV-1 Subtypes and Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in HIV-1-Positive Treatment-Naive Pregnant Women in Pointe Noire, Republic of the Congo (Kento-Mwana Project)

Bianca Bruzzone, Francesco Saladini, Laura Sticchi, Franc A. Mayinda Mboungou, Renata Barresi, Patrizia Caligiuri, Anna Calzi, Maurizio Zazzi, Giancarlo Icardi, Claudio Viscoli, Francesca Bisio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Kento-Mwana project was carried out in Pointe Noire, Republic of the Congo, to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. To determine the prevalence of different subtypes and transmitted drug resistance-associated mutations, 95 plasma samples were collected at baseline from HIV-1-positive naive pregnant women enrolled in the project during the years 2005-2008. Full protease and partial reverse transcriptase sequencing was performed and 68/95 (71.6%) samples were successfully sequenced. Major mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors were detected in 4/68 (5.9%), 3/68 (4.4%), and 2/68 (2.9%) samples, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 isolates showed a high prevalence of unique recombinant forms (24/68, 35%), followed by CRF45-cpx (7/68, 10.3%) and subsubtype A3 and subtype G (6/68 each, 8.8%). Although the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations appears to be currently limited, baseline HIV-1 genotyping is highly advisable in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy scale-up in resource-limited settings to optimize treatment and prevent perinatal transmission.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)837-840
Number of pages4
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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