Prevalence of HIV infection in a cohort of patients with congenital coagulation defects of the prothrombin complex factors.

M. T. Sartori, M. Mares, A. Del Mistro, A. De Rossi, P. Zerbinati, A. Girolami

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Abstract

Twenty-seven patients suffering from congenital coagulation defects of the prothrombin complex factors were investigated: six had haemophilia B; 14, factor VII defect; four, factor X defect; and three, factor II defect. Nineteen patients (70.3%) had previously received plasma and/or clotting factors concentrates. Among these, markers of hepatitis B infection (HBV) were present in five cases (26.3%) and hepatitis C (HCV) antibodies were found in seven cases (36.8%). The HIV1 prevalence was similarly high. In fact, five patients (26.3%), previously infused with factor IX or prothrombin complex factors concentrates, developed HIV1 infection. No patient with factor VII deficiency became HIV1 positive, despite the administration of unheated factor VII concentrates and the consequent HBV and HCV contamination. In the HIV1 positive group, three patients showed a false positivity for HIV2 antibodies. Five years after seroconversion, three patients developed AIDS (stage IV) and died, one had persistent generalized lymphadenopathy (stage III), and one with post-hepatitis liver cirrhosis was asymptomatic (stage II) for HIV infection. The significant decrease in total white cells, T4 lymphocytes and platelet counts and increase of beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin levels confirmed the prognostic value of these markers for the progression of HIV1 disease. Only one HIV1 negative transfused patient developed anti-HTLV-I p19 antibodies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)663-667
Number of pages5
JournalBlood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
Volume2
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1991

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Prothrombin
HIV Infections
Factor VII
Hepatitis C Antibodies
HTLV-I Antibodies
Factor VII Deficiency
Neopterin
Hemophilia B
beta 2-Microglobulin
Factor X
Factor IX
Blood Coagulation Factors
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Infection
Hepatitis B
Platelet Count
Liver Cirrhosis
Hepatitis
Disease Progression
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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Prevalence of HIV infection in a cohort of patients with congenital coagulation defects of the prothrombin complex factors. / Sartori, M. T.; Mares, M.; Del Mistro, A.; De Rossi, A.; Zerbinati, P.; Girolami, A.

In: Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis, Vol. 2, No. 5, 10.1991, p. 663-667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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