Prevalence of hypercalcemia in hospitalised patients: Effects of "correction" for serum albumin values

V. Carnevale, M. Pipino, M. Antonacci, C. Checchia, V. D'Alessandro, M. Errico, A. Greco, A. Varriale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypercalcemia is ideally detected by the measurement of serum ionised calcium. Because this is not widely available, in common clinical practice "albumin-corrected" calcium values are often utilized. Our study investigated whether the method used to measure serum albumin concentration may significantly interfere in the derived serum calcium values and, consequently, in the identification of hypercalcemic patients. In 170 consecutive patients admitted to our Department of Internal Medicine we measured serum total calcium, total protein, and albumin by colorimetric method; albumin concentration was also derived by electrophoresis assessment. After correcting serum calcium for colorimetrically (CA) and electrophoretically (EA) measured albumin values, the detected frequencies of hypercalcemia were compared, utilizing different cut-off limits (i.e. 11.0, 10.4 and 10.2 mg/dl). In our patients, the CA values were significantly lower than EA levels. As a consequence, EA-corrected calcium, as well as total calcium concentration were significantly lower than CA-corrected values. This may also account for the very different prevalence of hypercalcemic patients identified by serum total, EA-corrected and CA-corrected calcium values. Our data therefore indicate the importance of the method of albumin measurement in the determination of "corrected" calcium concentration.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Endocrinological Investigation
Volume28
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Hypercalcemia
Serum Albumin
Calcium
Albumins
Serum
Internal Medicine
Electrophoresis

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Hypercalcemia
  • Serum albumin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Carnevale, V., Pipino, M., Antonacci, M., Checchia, C., D'Alessandro, V., Errico, M., ... Varriale, A. (2005). Prevalence of hypercalcemia in hospitalised patients: Effects of "correction" for serum albumin values. Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, 28(5).

Prevalence of hypercalcemia in hospitalised patients : Effects of "correction" for serum albumin values. / Carnevale, V.; Pipino, M.; Antonacci, M.; Checchia, C.; D'Alessandro, V.; Errico, M.; Greco, A.; Varriale, A.

In: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, Vol. 28, No. 5, 2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carnevale, V. ; Pipino, M. ; Antonacci, M. ; Checchia, C. ; D'Alessandro, V. ; Errico, M. ; Greco, A. ; Varriale, A. / Prevalence of hypercalcemia in hospitalised patients : Effects of "correction" for serum albumin values. In: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation. 2005 ; Vol. 28, No. 5.
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