Prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus infection in Italian infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infections, and association between respiratory syncytial virus infection risk factors and disease severity

M. Lanari, M. Giovannini, L. Giuffré, A. Marini, G. Rondini, G. A. Rossi, R. Merolla, G. V. Zuccotti, G. P. Salvioli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study was designed to collect data on the prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in Italy in infants hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infections, and to evaluate which of the recognized risk factors might be associated with disease severity, Thirty two centers throughout Italy participated in the study. Over a 6-month period (November 1, 1999 to April 30, 2000), we evaluated all children 0.05, each comparison). Independent of the clinical diagnosis at admission, RSV infection was associated with more severe respiratory impairment. Environmental smoke exposure was higher in subjects with bronchiolitis than in those with wheezy bronchitis (P <0.04), and RSV+ was positively related with the birth order (P <0.05). The presence of older siblings and birth order plays an important role in RSV infection. The collected data show that, in Italy, RSV is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Gestational age, birth order, birth weight, and exposure to tobacco smoke affected the prevalence and severity of RSV-related lower respiratory tract disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)458-465
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Pulmonology
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Birth order
  • Birth weight
  • Bronchiolitis
  • Epidemiology
  • Gestational age
  • Passive tobacco smoke
  • Pneumonia
  • Respiratory syncytial virus
  • Wheezing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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