Primary hypothyroidism as a consequence of 131-I-metaiodobenzylguanidine treatment for children with neuroblastoma

P. Picco, A. Garaventa, F. Claudiani, M. Gattorno, B. De Bernardi, C. Borrone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. 131-I-metaiodobenzylguanidine is a radioiodinated compound selectively concentrated by cells of neuroectodermal origin, including neuroblastoma cells, for this reason it may represent a promising treatment modality for neuroblastoma in childhood. Although a potential side effect of 131-I-MIBG administration is thyroid dysfunction, relatively few data are reported about this issue. Methods. A series of 14 long term surviving patients with neuroblastoma who had been treated with 131-I-MIBG courses ranging from 2.5 to 5.5 gigabecquerels after surgical and conventional pharmacologic therapy is reported. Results. Twelve patients developed primary hypothyroidism that was clinically overt in 8 patients and compensated in 4 patients within 6-12 months of completion of 131-I-MIBG administration. Only in two patients was thyroid function spared. Significant correlations between the cumulative dose of 131-I-MIBG and the degree of thyroid failure were not found. Conclusions. Primary hypothyroidism appears to be a common side effect in children with neuroblastoma treated with 131-I-MIBG. This finding suggests that methods to preserve thyroid function other than oral administration of iodide should be sought.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1662-1664
Number of pages3
JournalCancer
Volume76
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Fingerprint

3-Iodobenzylguanidine
Hypothyroidism
Neuroblastoma
Thyroid Gland
Therapeutics
Iodides
Oral Administration

Keywords

  • 131-I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)
  • late effects
  • neuroblastoma
  • primary hypothyroidism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Primary hypothyroidism as a consequence of 131-I-metaiodobenzylguanidine treatment for children with neuroblastoma. / Picco, P.; Garaventa, A.; Claudiani, F.; Gattorno, M.; De Bernardi, B.; Borrone, C.

In: Cancer, Vol. 76, No. 9, 1995, p. 1662-1664.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - De Bernardi, B.

AU - Borrone, C.

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