Processed Meat and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Pooled Analysis of Three Italian Case-Control Studies

Valentina Rosato, Alessandra Tavani, Eva Negri, Diego Serraino, Maurizio Montella, Adriano Decarli, Carlo La Vecchia, Monica Ferraroni

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Abstract

To add evidence to the limited data available from southern Europe, we assessed the association between processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk. We analyzed data from three case-control studies conducted between 1985 and 2010 in various Italian areas, including a total of 3745 incident cases and 6804 hospital-based controls. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by unconditional multiple logistic regression models. The median consumption of processed meat was around 20 g/day both in cases and controls. The OR of colorectal cancer was 1.02 (95% CI 0.99–1.04) for an increase of 10 g/day of processed meat. The association was statistically significant for colon cancer (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06), particularly for proximal colon cancer (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04–1.14), while there was no relation with rectal cancer (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.95–1.03). The OR of proximal colon cancer was 1.38 (95% CI 1.08–1.75) for the highest sex-specific tertile of consumption (>25 g/day for men, >21.5 for women) compared with the lowest (<15 g/day), whereas no significant ORs were found for other anatomical subsites. Our findings indicate that there is no association with colorectal cancer overall, in the presence, however, of a positive association with proximal colon cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalNutrition and Cancer
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

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Meat
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Colonic Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Rectal Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Oncology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cancer Research

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Processed Meat and Colorectal Cancer Risk : A Pooled Analysis of Three Italian Case-Control Studies. / Rosato, Valentina; Tavani, Alessandra; Negri, Eva; Serraino, Diego; Montella, Maurizio; Decarli, Adriano; La Vecchia, Carlo; Ferraroni, Monica.

In: Nutrition and Cancer, 07.2017, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rosato, Valentina ; Tavani, Alessandra ; Negri, Eva ; Serraino, Diego ; Montella, Maurizio ; Decarli, Adriano ; La Vecchia, Carlo ; Ferraroni, Monica. / Processed Meat and Colorectal Cancer Risk : A Pooled Analysis of Three Italian Case-Control Studies. In: Nutrition and Cancer. 2017 ; pp. 1-7.
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