Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology?

Amir Ahmadi, Gregg W. Stone, Jonathon Leipsic, Leslee J. Shaw, Todd C. Villines, Morton J. Kern, Harvey Hecht, David Erlinge, Ori Ben-Yehuda, Akiko Maehara, Eloisa Arbustini, Patrick Serruys, Hector M. Garcia-Garcia, Jagat Narula

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Risk stratification in patients with stable ischemic heart disease is essential to guide treatment decisions. In this regard, whether coronary anatomy, physiology, or plaque morphology is the best determinant of prognosis (and driver an effective therapeutic risk reduction) remains one of the greatest ongoing debates in cardiology. In the present report, we review the evidence for each of these characteristics and explore potential algorithms that may enable a practical diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)317-329
Number of pages13
JournalCirculation Research
Volume119
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 8 2016

Keywords

  • coronary artery disease
  • fractional flow reserve
  • multidetector computed tomography
  • myocardial ischemia
  • plaque, atherosclerotic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Ahmadi, A., Stone, G. W., Leipsic, J., Shaw, L. J., Villines, T. C., Kern, M. J., Hecht, H., Erlinge, D., Ben-Yehuda, O., Maehara, A., Arbustini, E., Serruys, P., Garcia-Garcia, H. M., & Narula, J. (2016). Prognostic Determinants of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Anatomy, Physiology, or Morphology? Circulation Research, 119(2), 317-329. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.308952