Prognostic Usefulness of Dyspnea Versus Fatigue as Reason for Exercise Test Termination in Patients With Heart Failure

Paul Chase, Ross Arena, Jonathan Myers, Joshua Abella, Mary Ann Peberdy, Marco Guazzi, Aarti Kenjale, Daniel Bensimhon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) is an integral tool for assessing the clinical status and prognosis of patients with heart failure (HF). The present investigation examined differences in CPX variables and prognosis according to reason for test termination. One hundred eighty-three patients with HF (69% men, 31% women; mean age 53 ± 13 years, left ventricular ejection fraction at rest 24.3 ± 9.9%) underwent CPX in which the minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope, peak oxygen consumption, and peak respiratory exchange ratio were determined. Subjects were tracked for cardiac-related events for 2 years after CPX. Dyspnea and fatigue (general fatigue/leg fatigue) were the primary reasons for test termination in 79 and 104 patients, respectively. Peak oxygen consumption (15.4 ± 5.7 vs 17.5 ± 5.9 ml o2 · kg-1 · min-1) was significantly lower, whereas minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope (38.5 ± 12.8 vs 33.9 ± 9.8) was significantly higher in the dyspnea subgroup (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)879-882
Number of pages4
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume102
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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