Progressive and extensive hypomelanosis and extensive pityriasis alba: Same disease, different names?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We report the cases of five female patients with high skin phototype affected by relapsing, hypochromic, non-scaling macules occurring after the summer on the back and spreading over large areas of skin. Histological features disclosed decreased epidermal melanin. Psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) treatment proved to be beneficial, but new relapses were noted after stopping treatment. Clinical and histological features were consistent with the diagnosis of 'progressive and extensive hypomelanosis' described by Guillet in persons of mixed racial background. We discuss the differential diagnosis of the latter entity with respect to the other idiopathic acquired primitive hypomelanosis and hypothesize an overlapping with the so-called extensive pityriasis alba (EPA).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-372
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2005

Fingerprint

Pityriasis
Hypopigmentation
Names
Ficusin
Skin
Melanins
Differential Diagnosis
Recurrence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Dyschromia
  • Hypomelanosis
  • Hypopigmentation
  • Melanodermic metis
  • Pityriasis alba
  • PUVA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Progressive and extensive hypomelanosis and extensive pityriasis alba: Same disease, different names?",
abstract = "We report the cases of five female patients with high skin phototype affected by relapsing, hypochromic, non-scaling macules occurring after the summer on the back and spreading over large areas of skin. Histological features disclosed decreased epidermal melanin. Psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) treatment proved to be beneficial, but new relapses were noted after stopping treatment. Clinical and histological features were consistent with the diagnosis of 'progressive and extensive hypomelanosis' described by Guillet in persons of mixed racial background. We discuss the differential diagnosis of the latter entity with respect to the other idiopathic acquired primitive hypomelanosis and hypothesize an overlapping with the so-called extensive pityriasis alba (EPA).",
keywords = "Dyschromia, Hypomelanosis, Hypopigmentation, Melanodermic metis, Pityriasis alba, PUVA",
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T1 - Progressive and extensive hypomelanosis and extensive pityriasis alba

T2 - Same disease, different names?

AU - Di Lernia, Vi

AU - Ricci, C.

PY - 2005/5

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N2 - We report the cases of five female patients with high skin phototype affected by relapsing, hypochromic, non-scaling macules occurring after the summer on the back and spreading over large areas of skin. Histological features disclosed decreased epidermal melanin. Psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) treatment proved to be beneficial, but new relapses were noted after stopping treatment. Clinical and histological features were consistent with the diagnosis of 'progressive and extensive hypomelanosis' described by Guillet in persons of mixed racial background. We discuss the differential diagnosis of the latter entity with respect to the other idiopathic acquired primitive hypomelanosis and hypothesize an overlapping with the so-called extensive pityriasis alba (EPA).

AB - We report the cases of five female patients with high skin phototype affected by relapsing, hypochromic, non-scaling macules occurring after the summer on the back and spreading over large areas of skin. Histological features disclosed decreased epidermal melanin. Psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) treatment proved to be beneficial, but new relapses were noted after stopping treatment. Clinical and histological features were consistent with the diagnosis of 'progressive and extensive hypomelanosis' described by Guillet in persons of mixed racial background. We discuss the differential diagnosis of the latter entity with respect to the other idiopathic acquired primitive hypomelanosis and hypothesize an overlapping with the so-called extensive pityriasis alba (EPA).

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KW - Melanodermic metis

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