Progressive gray matter damage in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: A longitudinal diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study

Celia Oreja-Guevara, Marco Rovaris, Giuseppe Iannucci, Paola Valsasina, Domenico Caputo, Rosella Cavarretta, Maria Pia Sormani, Pasquale Ferrante, Giancarlo Comi, Massimo Filippi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT MRI) has the potential to provide in vivo information about tissue microstructure. In multiple sclerosis (MS), DT MRI has disclosed the presence of occult structural damage in the normal-appearing brain tissues. Objective: To investigate whether DT MRI is sensitive to longitudinal changes of brain damage that may occur beyond the resolution of T2-weighted images in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Design: Twenty-six untreated patients with relapsing-remitting MS were followed up for 18 months. Dualecho, DT and postcontrast TI-weighted MRIs of the brain were obtained at baseline and then every 3 months. Mean diffusivity (D) histograms of normal-appearing gray (GM) and white matter were produced. Total T2-hyperintense and TI-hypointense lesion volumes; normalized whole brain tissue, GM, and white matter volumes; percentage brain volume change between the study entry and exit images; average lesion D̄; and fractional anisotropy were also calculated. Results: During the study period, a significant decrease of normalized whole brain tissue, average lesion fractional anisotropy and normal-appearing GM D̄ histogram peak height, and a significant increase of , average normal-appearing GM D̄ and T2-hyperintense lesion volumes were observed. Changes of normal-appearing GM diffusivity were independent of the concomitant changes of normalized whole brain tissue and GM volumes. Conclusions: The DT MRI findings show progressive microstructural changes in the normal-appearing GM of patients with untreated relapsing-remitting MS. Such changes do not reflect a concomitant development of brain atrophy and confirm the importance of GM pathology in MS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)578-584
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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