Prolacting's role in the pathogenesis of the antiphospholipid syndrome

S. Praprotnik, N. Agmon-Levin, B. S. Porat-Katz, M. Blank, P. L. Meroni, R. Cervera, W. Miesbach, L. Stojanovich, M. Szyper-Kravitz, B. Rozman, M. Tomsic, Y. Shoenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increased levels of serum prolactin have been reported in patients with various autoimmune diseases and have been associated with lupus disease activity. Currently, there is a lack of data regarding hyperprolactinaemia in patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome. Hence, this study was carried out in order to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of hyperprolactinaemia in antiphospholipid syndrome. A total of 172 European patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and 100 geographically and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study; none had obvious causes of hyperprolactinaemia. All patients underwent clinical assessment for disease manifestations, in addition to laboratory assessment for serum prolactin, antiphospholipid antibodies and some other biomarkers of autoimmune diseases. The tests were performed utilizing the LIAISON® Analyzer (DiaSorin, Sallugia Italy). Hyperprolactinaemia was detected in 21/172 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and 0/100 controls (p <0.001). This significant difference was present in both genders and was obvious even after subgrouping the patients into primary and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome. When clinical features were compared, hyperprolactinaemia was associated with reproductive failure, including early and late pregnancy loss (p <0.05), as well as intrauterine growth retardation (p <0.05). Hyperprolactinaemia was negatively related to arthralgias, venous thrombosis, pulmonary microthrombosis, pulmonary hypertension in both primary antiphospholipid syndrome and antiphospholipid syndrome secondary to other diseases, and to neurological manifestations in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1515-1519
Number of pages5
JournalLupus
Volume19
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Hyperprolactinemia
Prolactin
Autoimmune Diseases
Antiphospholipid Antibodies
Fetal Growth Retardation
Arthralgia
Neurologic Manifestations
Serum
Pulmonary Hypertension
Venous Thrombosis
Italy
Biomarkers
Pregnancy
Lung

Keywords

  • antiphospholipid antibodies
  • antiphospholipid syndrome
  • hyperprolactinaemia
  • prolactin
  • reproductive failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Praprotnik, S., Agmon-Levin, N., Porat-Katz, B. S., Blank, M., Meroni, P. L., Cervera, R., ... Shoenfeld, Y. (2010). Prolacting's role in the pathogenesis of the antiphospholipid syndrome. Lupus, 19(13), 1515-1519. https://doi.org/10.1177/0961203310373781

Prolacting's role in the pathogenesis of the antiphospholipid syndrome. / Praprotnik, S.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Porat-Katz, B. S.; Blank, M.; Meroni, P. L.; Cervera, R.; Miesbach, W.; Stojanovich, L.; Szyper-Kravitz, M.; Rozman, B.; Tomsic, M.; Shoenfeld, Y.

In: Lupus, Vol. 19, No. 13, 11.2010, p. 1515-1519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Praprotnik, S, Agmon-Levin, N, Porat-Katz, BS, Blank, M, Meroni, PL, Cervera, R, Miesbach, W, Stojanovich, L, Szyper-Kravitz, M, Rozman, B, Tomsic, M & Shoenfeld, Y 2010, 'Prolacting's role in the pathogenesis of the antiphospholipid syndrome', Lupus, vol. 19, no. 13, pp. 1515-1519. https://doi.org/10.1177/0961203310373781
Praprotnik S, Agmon-Levin N, Porat-Katz BS, Blank M, Meroni PL, Cervera R et al. Prolacting's role in the pathogenesis of the antiphospholipid syndrome. Lupus. 2010 Nov;19(13):1515-1519. https://doi.org/10.1177/0961203310373781
Praprotnik, S. ; Agmon-Levin, N. ; Porat-Katz, B. S. ; Blank, M. ; Meroni, P. L. ; Cervera, R. ; Miesbach, W. ; Stojanovich, L. ; Szyper-Kravitz, M. ; Rozman, B. ; Tomsic, M. ; Shoenfeld, Y. / Prolacting's role in the pathogenesis of the antiphospholipid syndrome. In: Lupus. 2010 ; Vol. 19, No. 13. pp. 1515-1519.
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