Prolonged blockade of NMDA or mGluR5 glutamate receptors reduces nigrostriatal degeneration while inducing selective metabolic changes in the basal ganglia circuitry in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease

M. T. Armentero, Roberto Fancellu, Giuseppe Nappi, Placido Bramanti, Fabio Blandini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We compared the neuroprotective and metabolic effects of chronic treatment with ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, in rats bearing a unilateral nigrostriatal lesion induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The ionotropic, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 increased cell survival in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and corrected the metabolic hyperactivity (increased cytochrome oxidase activity) of the ipsilateral substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) associated with the lesion, but showed no effects on the 6-OHDA-induced hyperactivity of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Significant-although less pronounced-protection of SNc neurons was also observed following treatment with the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR5) antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylehtynyl)-pyridine (MPEP). As opposed to MK-801, MPEP abolished the STN metabolic hyperactivity associated with the nigrostriatal lesion, without affecting SNr activity. Specific modulation of STN hyperactivity obtained with mGluR5 blockade may, therefore, open interesting perspectives for the use of this class of compounds in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalNeurobiology of Disease
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006

Keywords

  • 6-Hydroxydopamine
  • Basal ganglia
  • Cytochrome oxidase
  • Ionotropic
  • Metabotropic
  • Neuroprotection
  • Rat
  • Striatum
  • Substantia nigra
  • Tyrosine hydroxylase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology

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