Promoting transfer in memory training for older adults

Elena Cavallini, John Dunlosky, Sara Bottiroli, Christopher Hertzog, Tomaso Vecchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: Many studies have focused on memory training in aging, showing that older adults can improve their performance. Unfortunately, the benefits of training can rarely be generalized to other tasks for which adults were not specifically trained. We investigated the benefits of instruction-based training in promoting transfer effects in older adults. Methods: In Experiment 1, we evaluated transfer effects in a training group who practiced using standard mnemonics to learn paired associates and word lists, and this group was given instructions about how the mnemonics could be used for two of the four transfer tasks (text learning, name-face learning, grocery list learning, place learning). In Experiment 2, we compared transfer effects for two different training groups: one practiced the strategies with the two trained tasks and did not receive instructions, and the other had the same practice but also received instructions on all the transfer tasks. Results: Transfer in text learning occurred in both experiments. This transfer is particularly interesting, as text learning was the most dissimilar task in terms of both the nature of the materials and the underlying processes that support performance. The transfer was reliably greater when training involved instructions about applicability than when it did not. Conclusions: Instructions to use practiced strategies on new materials may be a useful technique in promoting transfer in older adults. It seems that the lack of transfer does not necessarily arise from older adults' inabilities, but because they do not realize that trained strategies can (or should) be applied to new materials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-323
Number of pages10
JournalAging clinical and experimental research
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

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Keywords

  • Aging
  • Instruction
  • Memory intervention
  • Transfer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Promoting transfer in memory training for older adults. / Cavallini, Elena; Dunlosky, John; Bottiroli, Sara; Hertzog, Christopher; Vecchi, Tomaso.

In: Aging clinical and experimental research, Vol. 22, No. 4, 08.2010, p. 314-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cavallini, Elena ; Dunlosky, John ; Bottiroli, Sara ; Hertzog, Christopher ; Vecchi, Tomaso. / Promoting transfer in memory training for older adults. In: Aging clinical and experimental research. 2010 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 314-323.
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