Prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome

P. Pelosi, L. Brazzi, L. Gattinoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the last few years prone positioning has been used increasingly in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and this manoeuvre is now considered a simple and safe method to improve oxygenation. However, the physiological mechanisms causing respiratory function improvement as well as the real clinical benefit are not yet fully understood. The aim of this review is to discuss the physiological and clinical effects of prone positioning in patients with ARDS. The main physiological aims of prone positioning are: 1) to improve oxygenation; 2) to improve respiratory mechanics; 3) to homogenise the pleural pressure gradient, the alveolar inflation and the ventilation distribution; 4) to increase lung volume and reduce the amount of atelectatic regions; 5) to facilitate the drainage of secretions; and 6) to reduce ventilator-associated lung injury. According to the available data, the authors conclude that: 1) oxygenation improves in ∼70-80% of patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome; 2) the beneficial effects of oxygenation reduce after 1 week of mechanical ventilation; 3) the aetiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome may markedly affect the response to prone positioning; 4) extreme care is necessary when the manoeuvre is performed; 5) pressure sores are frequent and related to the number of pronations; 6) the supports used to prone and during positioning are different and nonstandardised among centres; and 7) intensive, care unit and hospital stay and mortality still remain high despite prone positioning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1017-1028
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2002

Fingerprint

Prone Position
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Respiratory Mechanics
Pronation
Patient Positioning
Pressure Ulcer
Economic Inflation
Lung Injury
Mechanical Ventilators
Hospital Mortality
Artificial Respiration
Intensive Care Units
Ventilation
Drainage
Length of Stay
Pressure
Lung
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Acute respiratory distress
  • Intensive care
  • Oxygenation
  • Prospective studies
  • Syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome. / Pelosi, P.; Brazzi, L.; Gattinoni, L.

In: European Respiratory Journal, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.10.2002, p. 1017-1028.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pelosi, P. ; Brazzi, L. ; Gattinoni, L. / Prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome. In: European Respiratory Journal. 2002 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 1017-1028.
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