Prospective and randomized evaluation of ACL reconstruction with three techniques: A clinical and radiographic evaluation at 5 years follow-up

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Abstract

A variety of graft sources have been used for ACL reconstruction to improve functions and kinematics in ACL deficient knees. The two most commonly used autogenous grafts are the central third of the patellar tendon and the hamstring tendon constructs. The choice of different grafts and different construct influence the final clinical outcome of ACL reconstruction. The 3 groups, of 25 patients each, were generated by choosing the technique (PT tendon, 4 strand hamstring, and single hamstring plus extraarticular plasty) to utilize and followed for 5 years, with an alternate systematic sampling. Our comparison has shown significant kneeling pain in the patellar tendon with respect to the groups with hamstrings techniques. Single hamstring plus extraarticular plasty achieved subjective score significantly higher with respect to the other two groups as well as for the time to resume sport. The study confirms that patellar tendon and hamstring can be equivalent options for ACL reconstruction. This study demonstrated that a superior outcome as far as subjective clinical findings were concerned, was obtained in group III. Patients in the latter group were also able to return to sports sooner than those in the bone-patellar tendon graft group and the four-strand hamstring group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1060-1069
Number of pages10
JournalKnee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
Volume14
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2006

Keywords

  • ACL reconstruction
  • Arthroscopy
  • Extraarticular plasty
  • Hamstrings
  • Patellar tendon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Surgery

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