Prosthetic devices shaped as tubular chambers for the treatment of large diaphyseal defects by guided bone regeneration

N. Nicoli Aldini, M. Fini, G. Giavaresi, G. A. Guzzardella, Roberto Giardino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Guided tissue regeneration is based on the hypothesis that the different tissues have unequal abilities to penetrate a wounded area during the healing process. The use of a device acting as a chamber allows the growth of a particular tissue and prevents the ingrowth of other tissues which impair the healing process. At the same time the chamber protects and maintains in situ the intrinsic growth factors so that they may perform their specific activity. Guided tissue regeneration currently plays a well-recognized role mostly in dentistry and peripheral nerve surgery but interesting perspectives have also opened up in orthopedics. Considering the possibility of using guided bone regeneration in the repair of diaphyseal bone defects, this updated survey highlights some critical points and pathways related to the state-of-the-art of this promising procedure, focusing particularly on the properties of the material to make the tubular chamber, the use of osteopromotive factors and the most appropriate animal model to be used for the experimental evaluation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-57
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Artificial Organs
Volume28
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2005

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Bone defects
  • Bone marrow stromal cells
  • Bone morphogenetic protein
  • Demineralized bone matrix
  • Guided bone regeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

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