Protective effects of carvedilol, a vasodilating β-adrenoceptor blocker, against in vivo low density lipoprotein oxidation in essential hypertension

Elena Maggi, Eugenia Marchesi, Donatella Covini, Claudia Negro, Guido Perani, Giorgio Bellomo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation plays a crucial role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and is enhanced in patients with essential hypertension. This finding has stimulated a search for antihypertensive drugs with high intrinsic antioxidant properties. We investigated the antihypertensive and antioxidant effects of carvedilol, a new vasodilating β-adrenoceptor blocking agent in a group of patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension after 4-month treatment. Carvedilol administration markedly increased the resistance to oxidation of LDL isolated from treated patients to values comparable to those of control, nonhypertensive subjects. This effect was achieved despite a significant loss in LDL-associated vitamin E. The increased resistance of LDL to oxidation promoted by carvedilol was not related to the normalization of previously increased blood pressure (BP). Indeed, the administration of other conventional antihypertensive drugs, capable of decreasing arterial BP but without high intrinsic antioxidant properties, to a control group of matched hypertensive patients failed to ameliorate LDL oxidation parameters. Carvedilol treatment also reduced the extent of in vivo LDL oxidation, as reflected by the decrease in antioxidized LDL autoantibody titer. This effect as well was detected only in the group of carvedilol-treated hypertensive patients and not after the simple reduction in BP obtained with antihypertensive drugs different from carvedilol.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)532-538
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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LDL Lipoproteins
Adrenergic Receptors
Antihypertensive Agents
Antioxidants
Blood Pressure
carvedilol
Essential Hypertension
Vitamin E
Autoantibodies
Atherosclerosis
Arterial Pressure
Control Groups
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Carvedilol
  • Hypertension
  • Low density lipoprotein
  • Oxidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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title = "Protective effects of carvedilol, a vasodilating β-adrenoceptor blocker, against in vivo low density lipoprotein oxidation in essential hypertension",
abstract = "Low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation plays a crucial role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and is enhanced in patients with essential hypertension. This finding has stimulated a search for antihypertensive drugs with high intrinsic antioxidant properties. We investigated the antihypertensive and antioxidant effects of carvedilol, a new vasodilating β-adrenoceptor blocking agent in a group of patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension after 4-month treatment. Carvedilol administration markedly increased the resistance to oxidation of LDL isolated from treated patients to values comparable to those of control, nonhypertensive subjects. This effect was achieved despite a significant loss in LDL-associated vitamin E. The increased resistance of LDL to oxidation promoted by carvedilol was not related to the normalization of previously increased blood pressure (BP). Indeed, the administration of other conventional antihypertensive drugs, capable of decreasing arterial BP but without high intrinsic antioxidant properties, to a control group of matched hypertensive patients failed to ameliorate LDL oxidation parameters. Carvedilol treatment also reduced the extent of in vivo LDL oxidation, as reflected by the decrease in antioxidized LDL autoantibody titer. This effect as well was detected only in the group of carvedilol-treated hypertensive patients and not after the simple reduction in BP obtained with antihypertensive drugs different from carvedilol.",
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T1 - Protective effects of carvedilol, a vasodilating β-adrenoceptor blocker, against in vivo low density lipoprotein oxidation in essential hypertension

AU - Maggi, Elena

AU - Marchesi, Eugenia

AU - Covini, Donatella

AU - Negro, Claudia

AU - Perani, Guido

AU - Bellomo, Giorgio

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - Low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation plays a crucial role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and is enhanced in patients with essential hypertension. This finding has stimulated a search for antihypertensive drugs with high intrinsic antioxidant properties. We investigated the antihypertensive and antioxidant effects of carvedilol, a new vasodilating β-adrenoceptor blocking agent in a group of patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension after 4-month treatment. Carvedilol administration markedly increased the resistance to oxidation of LDL isolated from treated patients to values comparable to those of control, nonhypertensive subjects. This effect was achieved despite a significant loss in LDL-associated vitamin E. The increased resistance of LDL to oxidation promoted by carvedilol was not related to the normalization of previously increased blood pressure (BP). Indeed, the administration of other conventional antihypertensive drugs, capable of decreasing arterial BP but without high intrinsic antioxidant properties, to a control group of matched hypertensive patients failed to ameliorate LDL oxidation parameters. Carvedilol treatment also reduced the extent of in vivo LDL oxidation, as reflected by the decrease in antioxidized LDL autoantibody titer. This effect as well was detected only in the group of carvedilol-treated hypertensive patients and not after the simple reduction in BP obtained with antihypertensive drugs different from carvedilol.

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