Protein structure prediction and biomolecular recognition: from protein sequence to peptidomimetic design with the human beta3 integrin.

R. Casadio, M. Compiani, A. Facchiano, P. Fariselli, P. Martelli, I. Jacoboni, I. Rossi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Computational tools can bridge the gap between sequence and protein 3D structure based on the notion that information is to be retrieved from the databases and that knowledge-based methods can help in approaching a solution of the protein-folding problem. To this aim our group has implemented neural network-based predictors capable of performing with some success in different tasks, including predictions of the secondary structure of globular and membrane proteins, the topology of membrane proteins and porins and stable alpha-helical segments suited for protein design. Moreover we have developed methods for predicting contact maps in proteins and the probability of finding a cysteine in a disulfide bridge, tools which can contribute to the goal of predicting the 3D structure starting from the sequence (the so called ab initio prediction). All our predictors take advantage of evolution information derived from the structural alignments of homologous (evolutionary related) proteins and taken from the sequence and structure databases. When it is necessary to build models for proteins of unknown spatial structure, which have very little homology with other proteins of known structure, non-standard techniques need to be developed and the tools for protein structure predictions may help in protein modeling. The results of a recent simulation performed in our lab highlights the role of high performing computing technology and of tools of computational biology in protein modeling and peptidomimetic design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)473-486
Number of pages14
JournalSAR and QSAR in Environmental Research
Volume13
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Peptidomimetics
Integrin beta3
Proteins
Protein Databases
Membrane Proteins
Porins
Protein folding
Protein Folding
Computational Biology
Membranes
Disulfides
Cysteine
Databases
Technology
Topology
Neural networks

Cite this

Protein structure prediction and biomolecular recognition : from protein sequence to peptidomimetic design with the human beta3 integrin. / Casadio, R.; Compiani, M.; Facchiano, A.; Fariselli, P.; Martelli, P.; Jacoboni, I.; Rossi, I.

In: SAR and QSAR in Environmental Research, Vol. 13, No. 3-4, 2002, p. 473-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Casadio, R. ; Compiani, M. ; Facchiano, A. ; Fariselli, P. ; Martelli, P. ; Jacoboni, I. ; Rossi, I. / Protein structure prediction and biomolecular recognition : from protein sequence to peptidomimetic design with the human beta3 integrin. In: SAR and QSAR in Environmental Research. 2002 ; Vol. 13, No. 3-4. pp. 473-486.
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