Protein traffic activates NF-kB gene signaling and promotes MCP-1-dependent interstitial inflammation

Roberta Donadelli, Mauro Abbate, Cristina Zanchi, Daniela Corna, Susanna Tomasoni, Ariela Benigni, Giuseppe Remuzzi, Carla Zoja

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mononuclear cells accumulate in the renal interstitium and contribute to renal injury in proteinuric nephropathies. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce protein trafficking and also lessen renal structural and functional damage. Many proinflammatory genes, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemoattractant for monocytes and T lymphocytes, are transcriptionally regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB). We aimed to study NF-kB activation and MCP-1 expression over time in two models of progressive proteinuric nephropathies (5/6 nephrectomy and passive Heymann nephritis [PHN]) and evaluate the effect of antiproteinuric therapy with an ACE inhibitor on these factors. In both models, increased urinary protein excretion over time was associated with a remarkable increase in NF-kB activity, which was almost completely suppressed by reducing proteinuria with lisinopril. NF-kB activation was paralleled by upregulation of MCP-1 messenger RNA and interstitial accumulation of ED-1-positive monocytes/macrophages and CD8-positive T cells. Lisinopril inhibited MCP-1 upregulation and limited interstitial inflammation. In a group of PHN rats with advanced disease and severe proteinuria, a dose of lisinopril high enough to inhibit renal ACE activity failed to reduce proteinuria and also did not limit NF-kB activation, which was sustained over time, along with MCP-1 gene overexpression and interstitial inflammation. These data suggest that NF-kB is activated in the presence of increased protein traffic, enhancing the nuclear transcription of the MCP-1 gene with potent chemotactic and inflammatory properties. This mechanism may help explain the long-term renal toxicity of filtered proteins. (C) 2000 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1226-1241
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume36
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

NF-kappa B
Chemokine CCL2
Lisinopril
Inflammation
Kidney
Proteinuria
Genes
Membranous Glomerulonephritis
Proteins
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Monocytes
Up-Regulation
T-Lymphocytes
Chemotactic Factors
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Protein Transport
Nephrectomy
Macrophages
Messenger RNA
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor
  • Interstitial inflammation
  • Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)
  • Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) activation
  • Proteinuria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

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title = "Protein traffic activates NF-kB gene signaling and promotes MCP-1-dependent interstitial inflammation",
abstract = "Mononuclear cells accumulate in the renal interstitium and contribute to renal injury in proteinuric nephropathies. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce protein trafficking and also lessen renal structural and functional damage. Many proinflammatory genes, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemoattractant for monocytes and T lymphocytes, are transcriptionally regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB). We aimed to study NF-kB activation and MCP-1 expression over time in two models of progressive proteinuric nephropathies (5/6 nephrectomy and passive Heymann nephritis [PHN]) and evaluate the effect of antiproteinuric therapy with an ACE inhibitor on these factors. In both models, increased urinary protein excretion over time was associated with a remarkable increase in NF-kB activity, which was almost completely suppressed by reducing proteinuria with lisinopril. NF-kB activation was paralleled by upregulation of MCP-1 messenger RNA and interstitial accumulation of ED-1-positive monocytes/macrophages and CD8-positive T cells. Lisinopril inhibited MCP-1 upregulation and limited interstitial inflammation. In a group of PHN rats with advanced disease and severe proteinuria, a dose of lisinopril high enough to inhibit renal ACE activity failed to reduce proteinuria and also did not limit NF-kB activation, which was sustained over time, along with MCP-1 gene overexpression and interstitial inflammation. These data suggest that NF-kB is activated in the presence of increased protein traffic, enhancing the nuclear transcription of the MCP-1 gene with potent chemotactic and inflammatory properties. This mechanism may help explain the long-term renal toxicity of filtered proteins. (C) 2000 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.",
keywords = "Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, Interstitial inflammation, Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) activation, Proteinuria",
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T1 - Protein traffic activates NF-kB gene signaling and promotes MCP-1-dependent interstitial inflammation

AU - Donadelli, Roberta

AU - Abbate, Mauro

AU - Zanchi, Cristina

AU - Corna, Daniela

AU - Tomasoni, Susanna

AU - Benigni, Ariela

AU - Remuzzi, Giuseppe

AU - Zoja, Carla

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Mononuclear cells accumulate in the renal interstitium and contribute to renal injury in proteinuric nephropathies. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce protein trafficking and also lessen renal structural and functional damage. Many proinflammatory genes, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemoattractant for monocytes and T lymphocytes, are transcriptionally regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB). We aimed to study NF-kB activation and MCP-1 expression over time in two models of progressive proteinuric nephropathies (5/6 nephrectomy and passive Heymann nephritis [PHN]) and evaluate the effect of antiproteinuric therapy with an ACE inhibitor on these factors. In both models, increased urinary protein excretion over time was associated with a remarkable increase in NF-kB activity, which was almost completely suppressed by reducing proteinuria with lisinopril. NF-kB activation was paralleled by upregulation of MCP-1 messenger RNA and interstitial accumulation of ED-1-positive monocytes/macrophages and CD8-positive T cells. Lisinopril inhibited MCP-1 upregulation and limited interstitial inflammation. In a group of PHN rats with advanced disease and severe proteinuria, a dose of lisinopril high enough to inhibit renal ACE activity failed to reduce proteinuria and also did not limit NF-kB activation, which was sustained over time, along with MCP-1 gene overexpression and interstitial inflammation. These data suggest that NF-kB is activated in the presence of increased protein traffic, enhancing the nuclear transcription of the MCP-1 gene with potent chemotactic and inflammatory properties. This mechanism may help explain the long-term renal toxicity of filtered proteins. (C) 2000 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

AB - Mononuclear cells accumulate in the renal interstitium and contribute to renal injury in proteinuric nephropathies. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce protein trafficking and also lessen renal structural and functional damage. Many proinflammatory genes, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemoattractant for monocytes and T lymphocytes, are transcriptionally regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB). We aimed to study NF-kB activation and MCP-1 expression over time in two models of progressive proteinuric nephropathies (5/6 nephrectomy and passive Heymann nephritis [PHN]) and evaluate the effect of antiproteinuric therapy with an ACE inhibitor on these factors. In both models, increased urinary protein excretion over time was associated with a remarkable increase in NF-kB activity, which was almost completely suppressed by reducing proteinuria with lisinopril. NF-kB activation was paralleled by upregulation of MCP-1 messenger RNA and interstitial accumulation of ED-1-positive monocytes/macrophages and CD8-positive T cells. Lisinopril inhibited MCP-1 upregulation and limited interstitial inflammation. In a group of PHN rats with advanced disease and severe proteinuria, a dose of lisinopril high enough to inhibit renal ACE activity failed to reduce proteinuria and also did not limit NF-kB activation, which was sustained over time, along with MCP-1 gene overexpression and interstitial inflammation. These data suggest that NF-kB is activated in the presence of increased protein traffic, enhancing the nuclear transcription of the MCP-1 gene with potent chemotactic and inflammatory properties. This mechanism may help explain the long-term renal toxicity of filtered proteins. (C) 2000 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

KW - Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor

KW - Interstitial inflammation

KW - Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)

KW - Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) activation

KW - Proteinuria

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JO - American Journal of Kidney Diseases

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