Psoriatic and psoriatic arthritis patients with and without jet-lag: does it matter for disease severity scores? Insights and implications from a pilot, prospective study

G. Damiani, N. L. Bragazzi, S. Garbarino, V. K. Chattu, C. M. Shapiro, A. Pacifico, P. Malagoli, P. D.M. Pigatto, R. R.Z. Conic, D. Tiodorovic, A. Watad, M. Adawi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Jet-lag may affect air-travelers crossing at least two time-zones and has several health-care implications. It occurs when the human biological rhythms are out of synch with respect to the day-night cycle at the country destination. Its effect in psoriasis is missing. We aimed to evaluate the effect of Jet-lag in psoriatic patients’ management. Methods: This is a prospective observational study that enrolled psoriatic patients that underwent a flight: patients who experienced jet-lag were compared to patients who did not experience jet-lag. Before the flight, a dermatologist recorded clinical and demographical data with particular attention to Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) and Disease Activity in Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA). Patients performed Self-Administered Psoriasis Area Severity Index (SAPASI), the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the pruritus Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores. After the flight, patients completed the SAPASI, DLQI and pruritus-VAS scores. Results: The sample recruited comprised of 70 psoriatic patients aged 42.4 ± 9.7 years (median 42.5 years). Thirty (42.9%) were males, mean BMI was 25.5 ± 2.2 kg/m2. Average disease duration was 15.2 ± 7.1 years, and 20 (28.6%) subjects had developed PsA. Average hours of flight were 5.4 ± 3.5 (median 3.5 h), with 34 (48.6%) subjects reporting jet-lag. At the multivariate regression analysis, the change in the SAPASI score resulted correlated with jet-lag (regression coefficient 1.63, p =.0092), as well the change in the DLQI score (regression coefficient = 1.73, p =.0009), but no change on the pruritus VAS scale was found. Conclusions: The present study suggests that jet-lag may influence disease severity and DLQI scores, but not itch in psoriatic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1733-1740
Number of pages8
JournalChronobiology International
Volume36
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2 2019

Fingerprint

Psoriatic Arthritis
Prospective Studies
Psoriasis
Dermatology
Pruritus
Visual Analog Scale
Quality of Life
Periodicity
Observational Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Air
Regression Analysis
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • circadian rhythm
  • DAPSA
  • human biological clock
  • jet-lag
  • melatonin
  • PASI
  • pruritus-VAS
  • Psoriasis
  • psoriatic arthritis
  • SAPASI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Psoriatic and psoriatic arthritis patients with and without jet-lag : does it matter for disease severity scores? Insights and implications from a pilot, prospective study. / Damiani, G.; Bragazzi, N. L.; Garbarino, S.; Chattu, V. K.; Shapiro, C. M.; Pacifico, A.; Malagoli, P.; Pigatto, P. D.M.; Conic, R. R.Z.; Tiodorovic, D.; Watad, A.; Adawi, M.

In: Chronobiology International, Vol. 36, No. 12, 02.12.2019, p. 1733-1740.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Damiani, G. ; Bragazzi, N. L. ; Garbarino, S. ; Chattu, V. K. ; Shapiro, C. M. ; Pacifico, A. ; Malagoli, P. ; Pigatto, P. D.M. ; Conic, R. R.Z. ; Tiodorovic, D. ; Watad, A. ; Adawi, M. / Psoriatic and psoriatic arthritis patients with and without jet-lag : does it matter for disease severity scores? Insights and implications from a pilot, prospective study. In: Chronobiology International. 2019 ; Vol. 36, No. 12. pp. 1733-1740.
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abstract = "Background: Jet-lag may affect air-travelers crossing at least two time-zones and has several health-care implications. It occurs when the human biological rhythms are out of synch with respect to the day-night cycle at the country destination. Its effect in psoriasis is missing. We aimed to evaluate the effect of Jet-lag in psoriatic patients’ management. Methods: This is a prospective observational study that enrolled psoriatic patients that underwent a flight: patients who experienced jet-lag were compared to patients who did not experience jet-lag. Before the flight, a dermatologist recorded clinical and demographical data with particular attention to Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) and Disease Activity in Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA). Patients performed Self-Administered Psoriasis Area Severity Index (SAPASI), the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the pruritus Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores. After the flight, patients completed the SAPASI, DLQI and pruritus-VAS scores. Results: The sample recruited comprised of 70 psoriatic patients aged 42.4 ± 9.7 years (median 42.5 years). Thirty (42.9{\%}) were males, mean BMI was 25.5 ± 2.2 kg/m2. Average disease duration was 15.2 ± 7.1 years, and 20 (28.6{\%}) subjects had developed PsA. Average hours of flight were 5.4 ± 3.5 (median 3.5 h), with 34 (48.6{\%}) subjects reporting jet-lag. At the multivariate regression analysis, the change in the SAPASI score resulted correlated with jet-lag (regression coefficient 1.63, p =.0092), as well the change in the DLQI score (regression coefficient = 1.73, p =.0009), but no change on the pruritus VAS scale was found. Conclusions: The present study suggests that jet-lag may influence disease severity and DLQI scores, but not itch in psoriatic patients.",
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T1 - Psoriatic and psoriatic arthritis patients with and without jet-lag

T2 - does it matter for disease severity scores? Insights and implications from a pilot, prospective study

AU - Damiani, G.

AU - Bragazzi, N. L.

AU - Garbarino, S.

AU - Chattu, V. K.

AU - Shapiro, C. M.

AU - Pacifico, A.

AU - Malagoli, P.

AU - Pigatto, P. D.M.

AU - Conic, R. R.Z.

AU - Tiodorovic, D.

AU - Watad, A.

AU - Adawi, M.

PY - 2019/12/2

Y1 - 2019/12/2

N2 - Background: Jet-lag may affect air-travelers crossing at least two time-zones and has several health-care implications. It occurs when the human biological rhythms are out of synch with respect to the day-night cycle at the country destination. Its effect in psoriasis is missing. We aimed to evaluate the effect of Jet-lag in psoriatic patients’ management. Methods: This is a prospective observational study that enrolled psoriatic patients that underwent a flight: patients who experienced jet-lag were compared to patients who did not experience jet-lag. Before the flight, a dermatologist recorded clinical and demographical data with particular attention to Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) and Disease Activity in Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA). Patients performed Self-Administered Psoriasis Area Severity Index (SAPASI), the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the pruritus Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores. After the flight, patients completed the SAPASI, DLQI and pruritus-VAS scores. Results: The sample recruited comprised of 70 psoriatic patients aged 42.4 ± 9.7 years (median 42.5 years). Thirty (42.9%) were males, mean BMI was 25.5 ± 2.2 kg/m2. Average disease duration was 15.2 ± 7.1 years, and 20 (28.6%) subjects had developed PsA. Average hours of flight were 5.4 ± 3.5 (median 3.5 h), with 34 (48.6%) subjects reporting jet-lag. At the multivariate regression analysis, the change in the SAPASI score resulted correlated with jet-lag (regression coefficient 1.63, p =.0092), as well the change in the DLQI score (regression coefficient = 1.73, p =.0009), but no change on the pruritus VAS scale was found. Conclusions: The present study suggests that jet-lag may influence disease severity and DLQI scores, but not itch in psoriatic patients.

AB - Background: Jet-lag may affect air-travelers crossing at least two time-zones and has several health-care implications. It occurs when the human biological rhythms are out of synch with respect to the day-night cycle at the country destination. Its effect in psoriasis is missing. We aimed to evaluate the effect of Jet-lag in psoriatic patients’ management. Methods: This is a prospective observational study that enrolled psoriatic patients that underwent a flight: patients who experienced jet-lag were compared to patients who did not experience jet-lag. Before the flight, a dermatologist recorded clinical and demographical data with particular attention to Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) and Disease Activity in Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA). Patients performed Self-Administered Psoriasis Area Severity Index (SAPASI), the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the pruritus Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores. After the flight, patients completed the SAPASI, DLQI and pruritus-VAS scores. Results: The sample recruited comprised of 70 psoriatic patients aged 42.4 ± 9.7 years (median 42.5 years). Thirty (42.9%) were males, mean BMI was 25.5 ± 2.2 kg/m2. Average disease duration was 15.2 ± 7.1 years, and 20 (28.6%) subjects had developed PsA. Average hours of flight were 5.4 ± 3.5 (median 3.5 h), with 34 (48.6%) subjects reporting jet-lag. At the multivariate regression analysis, the change in the SAPASI score resulted correlated with jet-lag (regression coefficient 1.63, p =.0092), as well the change in the DLQI score (regression coefficient = 1.73, p =.0009), but no change on the pruritus VAS scale was found. Conclusions: The present study suggests that jet-lag may influence disease severity and DLQI scores, but not itch in psoriatic patients.

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KW - human biological clock

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KW - melatonin

KW - PASI

KW - pruritus-VAS

KW - Psoriasis

KW - psoriatic arthritis

KW - SAPASI

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