Psychological and social implications of aging skin: Normal aging and the effects of cutaneous disease

Miranda A. Farage, Kenneth W. Miller, Enzo Berardesca, Howard I. Maibach

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aging, by definition, is a progressive deterioration of body structure and function [1, 2]. All organs, including the skin, age. The skin wrinkles, sags, and thins, becoming drier, rougher, and less elastic [1]. Successful aging transcends the inevitable physical decline and is characterized by adaptive psychosocial functioning that facilitates the maintenance of good mental health and satisfaction in daily life [3]. Although much of gerontological research in dermatology has focused on an aesthetic abeyance of the signs of aging, little real medical attention has been paid to the psychosocial effects of an aging integument [4]. The skin is the envelope of self and, therefore, the visible manifestation of personal identity [4]. It displays emotion, blanching, blushing, and sweating in response to internal feelings [5]. The social skin and its gerontological issues, then, must be contrasted to the merely biological skin [5].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTextbook of Aging Skin
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages949-957
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9783540896555
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Skin Aging
Skin Diseases
Psychology
Skin
Blushing
Emotions
Sweating
Dermatology
Esthetics
Mental Health
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Farage, M. A., Miller, K. W., Berardesca, E., & Maibach, H. I. (2010). Psychological and social implications of aging skin: Normal aging and the effects of cutaneous disease. In Textbook of Aging Skin (pp. 949-957). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-89656-2_89

Psychological and social implications of aging skin : Normal aging and the effects of cutaneous disease. / Farage, Miranda A.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Berardesca, Enzo; Maibach, Howard I.

Textbook of Aging Skin. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010. p. 949-957.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Farage, MA, Miller, KW, Berardesca, E & Maibach, HI 2010, Psychological and social implications of aging skin: Normal aging and the effects of cutaneous disease. in Textbook of Aging Skin. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 949-957. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-89656-2_89
Farage MA, Miller KW, Berardesca E, Maibach HI. Psychological and social implications of aging skin: Normal aging and the effects of cutaneous disease. In Textbook of Aging Skin. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2010. p. 949-957 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-89656-2_89
Farage, Miranda A. ; Miller, Kenneth W. ; Berardesca, Enzo ; Maibach, Howard I. / Psychological and social implications of aging skin : Normal aging and the effects of cutaneous disease. Textbook of Aging Skin. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010. pp. 949-957
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