Aspetti psicologici dei pazienti amputati in età pediatrica per malattie neoplastiche

Translated title of the contribution: Psychological aspects in patients with surgical amputations in pediatric age for malignant tumor

C. A. Clerici, A. Ferrari, M. Massimino, R. Luksch, G. Cefalo, M. Terenziani, M. Casanova, F. Spreafico, D. Polastri, F. Fossati Bellani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. Surgical amputations in pediatric age are rarer than in the past; nevertheless their emotional impact on patients, families and the health care team is strong. There are scanty reports on the psychological issues of children undergoing limb amputation because of a malignant tumor, and their results are sometimes contradictory. Methods. At the Pediatric Oncology Unit of Istituto Nazionale Tumori, in Milano (Italy), psychological support was provided to candidates for amputation and their families, on two different levels: medical psychology, involving the whole medical team, and clinical psychology, provided by a medical specialist in clinical psychology. Results. Fifteen patients were evaluated prior to and after mutilating surgery. Surgery was easier to accept when the tumor caused pain and functional loss. Specialize psychological support was needed in cases of defense mechanisms (e.g. scission and projection) and depressive reactions evolving into isolation or intolerance. Conclusions. The psychosocial approach we adopted seemed to supply adequate support to patients and their families, and might represent a guideline for such psychological interventions.

Translated title of the contributionPsychological aspects in patients with surgical amputations in pediatric age for malignant tumor
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)887-892
Number of pages6
JournalItalian Journal of Pediatrics
Volume27
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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