Psychosomatic assessment of skin diseases in clinical practice

Angelo Picardi, Paolo Pasquini, Damiano Abeni, Giovanni Fassone, Eva Mazzotti, Giovanni A. Fava

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Psychiatric disorders are frequent in dermatology patients, and many studies pointed out complex, mutual relationships between psyche and skin. Our aim was to provide a systematic psychosocial evaluation of a large and heterogeneous population of patients with skin diseases, including assessments of quality of life, psychiatric status according to the DSM-IV and psychological conditions with psychosomatic relevance according to established criteria (Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research, DCPR). Methods: We studied 545 dermatological inpatients aged 18-65 years, free from dementia and cognitive impairment. They completed the Skindex-29 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and were administered the SCID-I and the Structured Interview for Psychological Conditions of Psychosomatic Relevance by a trained mental health professional blinded to questionnaire scores. Results: Overall, 38% of patients received a DSM-IV diagnosis. The most common diagnoses were mood (20%) and anxiety disorders (16%); 48% of patients also received a DCPR diagnosis. The most common were demoralisation, irritable mood, type A behaviour and various forms of abnormal illness behaviour. Adjusting for gender, age, and education, the presence of DSM-IV or DCPR diagnoses was significantly associated with high scores on the GHQ-12 and on the Functioning and Emotions scales of the Skindex-29. Also, DCPR diagnoses were significantly associated with high scores on the Symptoms scale of the Skindex-29. Conclusions: These findings highlight the high frequency of psychosocial problems in patients with skin disease and suggest that the joint use of DSM-IV and DCPR criteria may help identify those patients in whom psychiatric issues are worthy of increased clinical attention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)315-322
Number of pages8
JournalPsychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Volume74
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2005

Fingerprint

Projective Techniques
Skin Diseases
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychiatry
Research
Irritable Mood
Psychological Interviews
Illness Behavior
Dermatology
Anxiety Disorders
Mood Disorders
Dementia
Inpatients
Mental Health
Emotions
Joints
Quality of Life
Psychology
Education
Skin

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • DCPR
  • Depression
  • Quality of life
  • Skin disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Picardi, A., Pasquini, P., Abeni, D., Fassone, G., Mazzotti, E., & Fava, G. A. (2005). Psychosomatic assessment of skin diseases in clinical practice. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 74(5), 315-322. https://doi.org/10.1159/000086323

Psychosomatic assessment of skin diseases in clinical practice. / Picardi, Angelo; Pasquini, Paolo; Abeni, Damiano; Fassone, Giovanni; Mazzotti, Eva; Fava, Giovanni A.

In: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Vol. 74, No. 5, 08.2005, p. 315-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Picardi, A, Pasquini, P, Abeni, D, Fassone, G, Mazzotti, E & Fava, GA 2005, 'Psychosomatic assessment of skin diseases in clinical practice', Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, vol. 74, no. 5, pp. 315-322. https://doi.org/10.1159/000086323
Picardi, Angelo ; Pasquini, Paolo ; Abeni, Damiano ; Fassone, Giovanni ; Mazzotti, Eva ; Fava, Giovanni A. / Psychosomatic assessment of skin diseases in clinical practice. In: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. 2005 ; Vol. 74, No. 5. pp. 315-322.
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