Pulmonary and chest wall mechanics in anesthetized paralyzed humans

E. D'Angelo, F. M. Robatto, E. Calderini, M. Tavola, D. Bono, G. Torri, J. Milic-Emili

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Pulmonary and chest wall mechanics were studied in 18 anesthetized paralyzed supine humans by use of the technique of rapid airway occlusion during constant-flow inflation. Analysis of the changes in transpulmonary pressure after flow interruption allowed partitioning of the overall resistance of the lung (RL) into two compartments, one (Rint,L) reflecting airway resistance and the other (ΔRL) representing the viscoelastic properties of the pulmonary tissues. Similar analysis of the changes in esophageal pressure indicates that chest wall resistance (Rw) was due entirely to the viscoelastic properties of the chest wall tissues (ΔRw = Rw). In line with previous measurements of airway resistance, Rint,L increased with increasing flow and decreased with increasing volume. The opposite was true for both ΔRL and ΔRw. This behavior was interpreted in terms of a viscoelastic model that allowed computation of the viscoelastic constants of the lung and chest wall. This model also accounts for frequency, volume, and flow dependence of elastance of the lung and chest wall. Static and dynamic elastances, as well as ΔR, were higher for the lung than for the chest wall.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2602-2610
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume70
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1991

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Thoracic Wall
Mechanics
Lung
Airway Resistance
Pressure
Economic Inflation

Keywords

  • airway and tissue resistance
  • constant-flow inflation
  • interrupter technique
  • static and dynamic elastance
  • viscoelastic properties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

D'Angelo, E., Robatto, F. M., Calderini, E., Tavola, M., Bono, D., Torri, G., & Milic-Emili, J. (1991). Pulmonary and chest wall mechanics in anesthetized paralyzed humans. Journal of Applied Physiology, 70(6), 2602-2610.

Pulmonary and chest wall mechanics in anesthetized paralyzed humans. / D'Angelo, E.; Robatto, F. M.; Calderini, E.; Tavola, M.; Bono, D.; Torri, G.; Milic-Emili, J.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 70, No. 6, 1991, p. 2602-2610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

D'Angelo, E, Robatto, FM, Calderini, E, Tavola, M, Bono, D, Torri, G & Milic-Emili, J 1991, 'Pulmonary and chest wall mechanics in anesthetized paralyzed humans', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 2602-2610.
D'Angelo E, Robatto FM, Calderini E, Tavola M, Bono D, Torri G et al. Pulmonary and chest wall mechanics in anesthetized paralyzed humans. Journal of Applied Physiology. 1991;70(6):2602-2610.
D'Angelo, E. ; Robatto, F. M. ; Calderini, E. ; Tavola, M. ; Bono, D. ; Torri, G. ; Milic-Emili, J. / Pulmonary and chest wall mechanics in anesthetized paralyzed humans. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1991 ; Vol. 70, No. 6. pp. 2602-2610.
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