Pulmonary function and abdominal adiposity in the general population

Heather M. Ochs-Balcom, Brydon J B Grant, Paola Muti, Christopher T. Sempos, Jo L. Freudenheim, Maurizio Trevisan, Patricia A. Cassano, Licia Iacoviello, Holger J. Schünemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

142 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of obesity is increasing, and there is evidence that obesity, in particular abdominal obesity as a marker of insulin resistance, is negatively associated with pulmonary function. The mechanism for this association and the best marker of abdominal adiposity in relation to pulmonary function is not known. Study objective: We assessed the association between pulmonary function and weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and abdominal height as markers of adiposity and body fat distribution. We used multiple linear regression to analyze the association of pulmonary function (ie, FEV1 and FVC) [with maneuvers performed in the sitting position] with overall adiposity markers (ie, weight and BMI) and abdominal adiposity markers, stratified by gender, and adjusted for height, age, race, smoking, and other covariates. Setting and participants: A random sample of individuals (n = 2,153) from the general population living in western New York state, 35 to 79 years of age. Results: In women, abdominal height and waist circumference were negatively associated with FEV1 percent predicted, while all five adiposity markers were negatively associated with FVC percent predicted. In men, all overall and abdominal adiposity markers were inversely associated with FEV1 percent predicted and FVC percent predicted. Conclusion: These results suggest that abdominal adiposity is a better predictor of pulmonary function than weight or BMI, and investigators should consider it when investigating the determinants of pulmonary function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)853-862
Number of pages10
JournalChest
Volume129
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Adiposity
Lung
Sagittal Abdominal Diameter
Population
Body Mass Index
Waist Circumference
Weights and Measures
Obesity
Body Fat Distribution
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abdominal Obesity
Posture
Insulin Resistance
Linear Models
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • Abdominal height
  • Airway obstruction
  • Body mass index
  • Body weight
  • Forced expiratory volume
  • FVC
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Ochs-Balcom, H. M., Grant, B. J. B., Muti, P., Sempos, C. T., Freudenheim, J. L., Trevisan, M., ... Schünemann, H. J. (2006). Pulmonary function and abdominal adiposity in the general population. Chest, 129(4), 853-862. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.129.4.853

Pulmonary function and abdominal adiposity in the general population. / Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Grant, Brydon J B; Muti, Paola; Sempos, Christopher T.; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Trevisan, Maurizio; Cassano, Patricia A.; Iacoviello, Licia; Schünemann, Holger J.

In: Chest, Vol. 129, No. 4, 04.2006, p. 853-862.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ochs-Balcom, HM, Grant, BJB, Muti, P, Sempos, CT, Freudenheim, JL, Trevisan, M, Cassano, PA, Iacoviello, L & Schünemann, HJ 2006, 'Pulmonary function and abdominal adiposity in the general population', Chest, vol. 129, no. 4, pp. 853-862. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.129.4.853
Ochs-Balcom HM, Grant BJB, Muti P, Sempos CT, Freudenheim JL, Trevisan M et al. Pulmonary function and abdominal adiposity in the general population. Chest. 2006 Apr;129(4):853-862. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.129.4.853
Ochs-Balcom, Heather M. ; Grant, Brydon J B ; Muti, Paola ; Sempos, Christopher T. ; Freudenheim, Jo L. ; Trevisan, Maurizio ; Cassano, Patricia A. ; Iacoviello, Licia ; Schünemann, Holger J. / Pulmonary function and abdominal adiposity in the general population. In: Chest. 2006 ; Vol. 129, No. 4. pp. 853-862.
@article{a0697356c66f4547b965ef0051485344,
title = "Pulmonary function and abdominal adiposity in the general population",
abstract = "Background: The prevalence of obesity is increasing, and there is evidence that obesity, in particular abdominal obesity as a marker of insulin resistance, is negatively associated with pulmonary function. The mechanism for this association and the best marker of abdominal adiposity in relation to pulmonary function is not known. Study objective: We assessed the association between pulmonary function and weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and abdominal height as markers of adiposity and body fat distribution. We used multiple linear regression to analyze the association of pulmonary function (ie, FEV1 and FVC) [with maneuvers performed in the sitting position] with overall adiposity markers (ie, weight and BMI) and abdominal adiposity markers, stratified by gender, and adjusted for height, age, race, smoking, and other covariates. Setting and participants: A random sample of individuals (n = 2,153) from the general population living in western New York state, 35 to 79 years of age. Results: In women, abdominal height and waist circumference were negatively associated with FEV1 percent predicted, while all five adiposity markers were negatively associated with FVC percent predicted. In men, all overall and abdominal adiposity markers were inversely associated with FEV1 percent predicted and FVC percent predicted. Conclusion: These results suggest that abdominal adiposity is a better predictor of pulmonary function than weight or BMI, and investigators should consider it when investigating the determinants of pulmonary function.",
keywords = "Abdominal height, Airway obstruction, Body mass index, Body weight, Forced expiratory volume, FVC, Obesity",
author = "Ochs-Balcom, {Heather M.} and Grant, {Brydon J B} and Paola Muti and Sempos, {Christopher T.} and Freudenheim, {Jo L.} and Maurizio Trevisan and Cassano, {Patricia A.} and Licia Iacoviello and Sch{\"u}nemann, {Holger J.}",
year = "2006",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1378/chest.129.4.853",
language = "English",
volume = "129",
pages = "853--862",
journal = "Chest",
issn = "0012-3692",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pulmonary function and abdominal adiposity in the general population

AU - Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.

AU - Grant, Brydon J B

AU - Muti, Paola

AU - Sempos, Christopher T.

AU - Freudenheim, Jo L.

AU - Trevisan, Maurizio

AU - Cassano, Patricia A.

AU - Iacoviello, Licia

AU - Schünemann, Holger J.

PY - 2006/4

Y1 - 2006/4

N2 - Background: The prevalence of obesity is increasing, and there is evidence that obesity, in particular abdominal obesity as a marker of insulin resistance, is negatively associated with pulmonary function. The mechanism for this association and the best marker of abdominal adiposity in relation to pulmonary function is not known. Study objective: We assessed the association between pulmonary function and weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and abdominal height as markers of adiposity and body fat distribution. We used multiple linear regression to analyze the association of pulmonary function (ie, FEV1 and FVC) [with maneuvers performed in the sitting position] with overall adiposity markers (ie, weight and BMI) and abdominal adiposity markers, stratified by gender, and adjusted for height, age, race, smoking, and other covariates. Setting and participants: A random sample of individuals (n = 2,153) from the general population living in western New York state, 35 to 79 years of age. Results: In women, abdominal height and waist circumference were negatively associated with FEV1 percent predicted, while all five adiposity markers were negatively associated with FVC percent predicted. In men, all overall and abdominal adiposity markers were inversely associated with FEV1 percent predicted and FVC percent predicted. Conclusion: These results suggest that abdominal adiposity is a better predictor of pulmonary function than weight or BMI, and investigators should consider it when investigating the determinants of pulmonary function.

AB - Background: The prevalence of obesity is increasing, and there is evidence that obesity, in particular abdominal obesity as a marker of insulin resistance, is negatively associated with pulmonary function. The mechanism for this association and the best marker of abdominal adiposity in relation to pulmonary function is not known. Study objective: We assessed the association between pulmonary function and weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and abdominal height as markers of adiposity and body fat distribution. We used multiple linear regression to analyze the association of pulmonary function (ie, FEV1 and FVC) [with maneuvers performed in the sitting position] with overall adiposity markers (ie, weight and BMI) and abdominal adiposity markers, stratified by gender, and adjusted for height, age, race, smoking, and other covariates. Setting and participants: A random sample of individuals (n = 2,153) from the general population living in western New York state, 35 to 79 years of age. Results: In women, abdominal height and waist circumference were negatively associated with FEV1 percent predicted, while all five adiposity markers were negatively associated with FVC percent predicted. In men, all overall and abdominal adiposity markers were inversely associated with FEV1 percent predicted and FVC percent predicted. Conclusion: These results suggest that abdominal adiposity is a better predictor of pulmonary function than weight or BMI, and investigators should consider it when investigating the determinants of pulmonary function.

KW - Abdominal height

KW - Airway obstruction

KW - Body mass index

KW - Body weight

KW - Forced expiratory volume

KW - FVC

KW - Obesity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645995133&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645995133&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1378/chest.129.4.853

DO - 10.1378/chest.129.4.853

M3 - Article

C2 - 16608930

AN - SCOPUS:33645995133

VL - 129

SP - 853

EP - 862

JO - Chest

JF - Chest

SN - 0012-3692

IS - 4

ER -