Pulmonary function changes after interscalene brachial plexus anesthesia with 0.5% and 0.75% ropivacaine: A double-blinded comparison with 2% mepivacaine

Andrea Casati, Guido Fanelli, Valeria Cedrati, Marco Berti, Giorgio Aldegheri, Giorgio Torri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to compare, in a prospective, double-blinded fashion, 0.5% and 0.75% ropivacaine with 2% mepivacaine to determine their effects on respiratory function during interscalene brachial plexus (IBP) anesthesia. With ethical committee approval and written, informed consent, 30 healthy patients presenting for elective shoulder capsuloplastic or acromioplastic procedures were randomized to receive IBP anesthesia by 20 mL of either 0.5% ropivacaine (n = 10), 0.75% ropivacaine (n = 10), or 2% mepivacaine (n = 10). Block onset time, pulmonary function variables, ipsilateral hemidiaphragmatic motion (ultrasonographic evaluation), and first requirement of postoperative analgesic were evaluated. Surgical anesthesia (loss of pinprick sensation from C4 to C7 and motor block of the shoulder joint) was achieved later with 0.5% ropivacaine than with either 0.75% ropivacaine or 2% mepivacaine (P <0.05), whereas the first pain medication was requested later with both ropivacaine concentrations than with mepivacaine (P <0.0005). No differences in quality of the block or patient acceptance were observed in the three groups. All 30 patients had ipsilateral hemidiaphragmatic paresis and large mean decreases in forced vital capacity (ropivacaine 0.5%: 40% ± 17%, ropivacaine 0.75%: 41% ± 22%, mepivacaine 2%: 39% ± 21%) and forced expiratory volume at 1 s (ropivacaine 0.5%: 30% ± 19%, ropivacaine 0.75%: 38% ± 26%, mepivacaine 2%: 40% ± 10%). We conclude that, when performing IBP anesthesia, 0.5% ropivacaine does not decrease the incidence of ipsilateral paresis of the hemidiaphragm compared with 0.75% ropivacaine and 2% mepivacaine. Implications: During the first 30 min after placing interscalene brachial plexus anesthesia, 0.5% ropivacaine does not provide clinically relevant advantages in terms of pulmonary function changes compared with either 0.75% ropivacaine or 2% mepivacaine. However, 0.75% ropivacaine allows a short onset, similar to that of mepivacaine, with long postoperative analgesia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)587-592
Number of pages6
JournalAnesthesia and Analgesia
Volume88
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1999

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Mepivacaine
Lung
ropivacaine
Brachial Plexus Block
Paresis
Shoulder Joint
Vital Capacity
Forced Expiratory Volume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Pulmonary function changes after interscalene brachial plexus anesthesia with 0.5% and 0.75% ropivacaine : A double-blinded comparison with 2% mepivacaine. / Casati, Andrea; Fanelli, Guido; Cedrati, Valeria; Berti, Marco; Aldegheri, Giorgio; Torri, Giorgio.

In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, Vol. 88, No. 3, 03.1999, p. 587-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Casati, Andrea ; Fanelli, Guido ; Cedrati, Valeria ; Berti, Marco ; Aldegheri, Giorgio ; Torri, Giorgio. / Pulmonary function changes after interscalene brachial plexus anesthesia with 0.5% and 0.75% ropivacaine : A double-blinded comparison with 2% mepivacaine. In: Anesthesia and Analgesia. 1999 ; Vol. 88, No. 3. pp. 587-592.
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abstract = "The purpose of this investigation was to compare, in a prospective, double-blinded fashion, 0.5{\%} and 0.75{\%} ropivacaine with 2{\%} mepivacaine to determine their effects on respiratory function during interscalene brachial plexus (IBP) anesthesia. With ethical committee approval and written, informed consent, 30 healthy patients presenting for elective shoulder capsuloplastic or acromioplastic procedures were randomized to receive IBP anesthesia by 20 mL of either 0.5{\%} ropivacaine (n = 10), 0.75{\%} ropivacaine (n = 10), or 2{\%} mepivacaine (n = 10). Block onset time, pulmonary function variables, ipsilateral hemidiaphragmatic motion (ultrasonographic evaluation), and first requirement of postoperative analgesic were evaluated. Surgical anesthesia (loss of pinprick sensation from C4 to C7 and motor block of the shoulder joint) was achieved later with 0.5{\%} ropivacaine than with either 0.75{\%} ropivacaine or 2{\%} mepivacaine (P <0.05), whereas the first pain medication was requested later with both ropivacaine concentrations than with mepivacaine (P <0.0005). No differences in quality of the block or patient acceptance were observed in the three groups. All 30 patients had ipsilateral hemidiaphragmatic paresis and large mean decreases in forced vital capacity (ropivacaine 0.5{\%}: 40{\%} ± 17{\%}, ropivacaine 0.75{\%}: 41{\%} ± 22{\%}, mepivacaine 2{\%}: 39{\%} ± 21{\%}) and forced expiratory volume at 1 s (ropivacaine 0.5{\%}: 30{\%} ± 19{\%}, ropivacaine 0.75{\%}: 38{\%} ± 26{\%}, mepivacaine 2{\%}: 40{\%} ± 10{\%}). We conclude that, when performing IBP anesthesia, 0.5{\%} ropivacaine does not decrease the incidence of ipsilateral paresis of the hemidiaphragm compared with 0.75{\%} ropivacaine and 2{\%} mepivacaine. Implications: During the first 30 min after placing interscalene brachial plexus anesthesia, 0.5{\%} ropivacaine does not provide clinically relevant advantages in terms of pulmonary function changes compared with either 0.75{\%} ropivacaine or 2{\%} mepivacaine. However, 0.75{\%} ropivacaine allows a short onset, similar to that of mepivacaine, with long postoperative analgesia.",
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N2 - The purpose of this investigation was to compare, in a prospective, double-blinded fashion, 0.5% and 0.75% ropivacaine with 2% mepivacaine to determine their effects on respiratory function during interscalene brachial plexus (IBP) anesthesia. With ethical committee approval and written, informed consent, 30 healthy patients presenting for elective shoulder capsuloplastic or acromioplastic procedures were randomized to receive IBP anesthesia by 20 mL of either 0.5% ropivacaine (n = 10), 0.75% ropivacaine (n = 10), or 2% mepivacaine (n = 10). Block onset time, pulmonary function variables, ipsilateral hemidiaphragmatic motion (ultrasonographic evaluation), and first requirement of postoperative analgesic were evaluated. Surgical anesthesia (loss of pinprick sensation from C4 to C7 and motor block of the shoulder joint) was achieved later with 0.5% ropivacaine than with either 0.75% ropivacaine or 2% mepivacaine (P <0.05), whereas the first pain medication was requested later with both ropivacaine concentrations than with mepivacaine (P <0.0005). No differences in quality of the block or patient acceptance were observed in the three groups. All 30 patients had ipsilateral hemidiaphragmatic paresis and large mean decreases in forced vital capacity (ropivacaine 0.5%: 40% ± 17%, ropivacaine 0.75%: 41% ± 22%, mepivacaine 2%: 39% ± 21%) and forced expiratory volume at 1 s (ropivacaine 0.5%: 30% ± 19%, ropivacaine 0.75%: 38% ± 26%, mepivacaine 2%: 40% ± 10%). We conclude that, when performing IBP anesthesia, 0.5% ropivacaine does not decrease the incidence of ipsilateral paresis of the hemidiaphragm compared with 0.75% ropivacaine and 2% mepivacaine. Implications: During the first 30 min after placing interscalene brachial plexus anesthesia, 0.5% ropivacaine does not provide clinically relevant advantages in terms of pulmonary function changes compared with either 0.75% ropivacaine or 2% mepivacaine. However, 0.75% ropivacaine allows a short onset, similar to that of mepivacaine, with long postoperative analgesia.

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