Pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity are related to cognitive decline in the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging

Shari R. Waldstein, S. Carrington Rice, Julian F. Thayer, Samer S. Najjar, Angelo Scuteri, Alan B. Zonderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

250 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity, markers of arterial stiffness, have been associated with stroke, dementia, and lowered levels of cognitive function. Here we examine longitudinal relations of pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity to multiple domains of cognitive function among nondemented, stroke-free persons. Up to 1749 participants from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging completed tests of verbal and nonverbal memory, attention, perceptuo-motor speed, confrontation naming, executive functions, and cognitive screening measures, as well as concurrent sphygmomanometric assessment of blood pressure (for derivation of pulse pressure) on 1 to 8 occasions over 14 years. A subset of ≤582 participants also underwent a single baseline assessment of pulse wave velocity and cognitive assessment on 1 to 6 occasions over 11 years. Results of mixed-effects regression models revealed a prospective decline on tests of verbal learning, nonverbal memory, working memory, and a cognitive screening measure among those with increasing levels of pulse pressure (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-104
Number of pages6
JournalHypertension
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

Fingerprint

Baltimore
Pulse Wave Analysis
Longitudinal Studies
Blood Pressure
Cognition
Stroke
Verbal Learning
Vascular Stiffness
Executive Function
Short-Term Memory
Dementia
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Arterial stiffness
  • Brain
  • Cognitive function
  • Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Waldstein, S. R., Rice, S. C., Thayer, J. F., Najjar, S. S., Scuteri, A., & Zonderman, A. B. (2008). Pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity are related to cognitive decline in the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging. Hypertension, 51(1), 99-104. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.107.093674

Pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity are related to cognitive decline in the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging. / Waldstein, Shari R.; Rice, S. Carrington; Thayer, Julian F.; Najjar, Samer S.; Scuteri, Angelo; Zonderman, Alan B.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 51, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 99-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waldstein, Shari R. ; Rice, S. Carrington ; Thayer, Julian F. ; Najjar, Samer S. ; Scuteri, Angelo ; Zonderman, Alan B. / Pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity are related to cognitive decline in the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging. In: Hypertension. 2008 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 99-104.
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