Pure ovarian immature teratoma, a unique and curable disease: 10 years’ experience of 32 prospectively treated patients

Cristina Bonazzi, Fedro Peccatori, Nicoletta Colombo, Valeria Lucchini, Maria Grazia Cantu, Costantino Mangioni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To report and evaluate a conservative and individualized treatment policy in a homogeneously selected series of patients affected by pure ovarian immature teratoma. Methods: This prospective trial, with specific treatment policies according to stage and grade, was planned and started in 1982. The study population consisted of 32 patients affected by pure immature teratoma, with the exclusion of mixed germ cell tumors. Fertility-sparing surgery was performed whenever possible. Surgery alone, with careful follow-up, was adopted for stage I or II according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and grade 1 or 2 tumors. The other patients, with stage III or with grade 3 stage I or II tumors, or those referred at relapse, were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. Results: Thirty of 32 patients underwent fertility-sparing surgery. Ten of 32 patients received chemotherapy after surgery, either as adjuvant treatment or in the presence of visible tumor. All 32 patients are alive and disease-free, with a median follow-up from surgery of 47 months (range 11-138). In six patients, regardless of the administration of chemotherapy, the tumor either spontaneously differentiated toward mature glia or increased in volume, mimicking progression but still remaining completely mature. Five of six patients wishing to procreate had a total of seven normal pregnancies. Conclusions: Pure ovarian immature teratoma is a potentially curable disease with a unique natural history. Our data substantiate the hypothesis that low-grade and low-stage tumors do not require chemotherapy, and that a fertilitysparing surgical approach is warranted in all cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)598-604
Number of pages7
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume84
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Teratoma
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Fertility
Ovarian Teratoma
Germ Cell and Embryonal Neoplasms
Platinum
Natural History
Gynecology
Neuroglia
Obstetrics
Recurrence
Pregnancy
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Pure ovarian immature teratoma, a unique and curable disease : 10 years’ experience of 32 prospectively treated patients. / Bonazzi, Cristina; Peccatori, Fedro; Colombo, Nicoletta; Lucchini, Valeria; Cantu, Maria Grazia; Mangioni, Costantino.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 84, No. 4, 1994, p. 598-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bonazzi, Cristina ; Peccatori, Fedro ; Colombo, Nicoletta ; Lucchini, Valeria ; Cantu, Maria Grazia ; Mangioni, Costantino. / Pure ovarian immature teratoma, a unique and curable disease : 10 years’ experience of 32 prospectively treated patients. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1994 ; Vol. 84, No. 4. pp. 598-604.
@article{5ab540e808304286b17004f6fb2cbe1a,
title = "Pure ovarian immature teratoma, a unique and curable disease: 10 years’ experience of 32 prospectively treated patients",
abstract = "Objective: To report and evaluate a conservative and individualized treatment policy in a homogeneously selected series of patients affected by pure ovarian immature teratoma. Methods: This prospective trial, with specific treatment policies according to stage and grade, was planned and started in 1982. The study population consisted of 32 patients affected by pure immature teratoma, with the exclusion of mixed germ cell tumors. Fertility-sparing surgery was performed whenever possible. Surgery alone, with careful follow-up, was adopted for stage I or II according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and grade 1 or 2 tumors. The other patients, with stage III or with grade 3 stage I or II tumors, or those referred at relapse, were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. Results: Thirty of 32 patients underwent fertility-sparing surgery. Ten of 32 patients received chemotherapy after surgery, either as adjuvant treatment or in the presence of visible tumor. All 32 patients are alive and disease-free, with a median follow-up from surgery of 47 months (range 11-138). In six patients, regardless of the administration of chemotherapy, the tumor either spontaneously differentiated toward mature glia or increased in volume, mimicking progression but still remaining completely mature. Five of six patients wishing to procreate had a total of seven normal pregnancies. Conclusions: Pure ovarian immature teratoma is a potentially curable disease with a unique natural history. Our data substantiate the hypothesis that low-grade and low-stage tumors do not require chemotherapy, and that a fertilitysparing surgical approach is warranted in all cases.",
author = "Cristina Bonazzi and Fedro Peccatori and Nicoletta Colombo and Valeria Lucchini and Cantu, {Maria Grazia} and Costantino Mangioni",
year = "1994",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "598--604",
journal = "Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0029-7844",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pure ovarian immature teratoma, a unique and curable disease

T2 - 10 years’ experience of 32 prospectively treated patients

AU - Bonazzi, Cristina

AU - Peccatori, Fedro

AU - Colombo, Nicoletta

AU - Lucchini, Valeria

AU - Cantu, Maria Grazia

AU - Mangioni, Costantino

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Objective: To report and evaluate a conservative and individualized treatment policy in a homogeneously selected series of patients affected by pure ovarian immature teratoma. Methods: This prospective trial, with specific treatment policies according to stage and grade, was planned and started in 1982. The study population consisted of 32 patients affected by pure immature teratoma, with the exclusion of mixed germ cell tumors. Fertility-sparing surgery was performed whenever possible. Surgery alone, with careful follow-up, was adopted for stage I or II according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and grade 1 or 2 tumors. The other patients, with stage III or with grade 3 stage I or II tumors, or those referred at relapse, were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. Results: Thirty of 32 patients underwent fertility-sparing surgery. Ten of 32 patients received chemotherapy after surgery, either as adjuvant treatment or in the presence of visible tumor. All 32 patients are alive and disease-free, with a median follow-up from surgery of 47 months (range 11-138). In six patients, regardless of the administration of chemotherapy, the tumor either spontaneously differentiated toward mature glia or increased in volume, mimicking progression but still remaining completely mature. Five of six patients wishing to procreate had a total of seven normal pregnancies. Conclusions: Pure ovarian immature teratoma is a potentially curable disease with a unique natural history. Our data substantiate the hypothesis that low-grade and low-stage tumors do not require chemotherapy, and that a fertilitysparing surgical approach is warranted in all cases.

AB - Objective: To report and evaluate a conservative and individualized treatment policy in a homogeneously selected series of patients affected by pure ovarian immature teratoma. Methods: This prospective trial, with specific treatment policies according to stage and grade, was planned and started in 1982. The study population consisted of 32 patients affected by pure immature teratoma, with the exclusion of mixed germ cell tumors. Fertility-sparing surgery was performed whenever possible. Surgery alone, with careful follow-up, was adopted for stage I or II according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and grade 1 or 2 tumors. The other patients, with stage III or with grade 3 stage I or II tumors, or those referred at relapse, were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. Results: Thirty of 32 patients underwent fertility-sparing surgery. Ten of 32 patients received chemotherapy after surgery, either as adjuvant treatment or in the presence of visible tumor. All 32 patients are alive and disease-free, with a median follow-up from surgery of 47 months (range 11-138). In six patients, regardless of the administration of chemotherapy, the tumor either spontaneously differentiated toward mature glia or increased in volume, mimicking progression but still remaining completely mature. Five of six patients wishing to procreate had a total of seven normal pregnancies. Conclusions: Pure ovarian immature teratoma is a potentially curable disease with a unique natural history. Our data substantiate the hypothesis that low-grade and low-stage tumors do not require chemotherapy, and that a fertilitysparing surgical approach is warranted in all cases.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028148119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028148119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7522313

AN - SCOPUS:0028148119

VL - 84

SP - 598

EP - 604

JO - Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0029-7844

IS - 4

ER -