Quality of life, pain, and psychological factors in patients undergoing surgery for primary tumors of the spine

Francesca Luzzati, Emanuele Maria Giusti, Gennaro Maria Scotto, Giuseppe Perrucchini, Luca Cannavò, Gianluca Castelnuovo, Andrea Colonna Cottini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Knowledge about quality of life (QOL), pain, and psychological factors in patients with primary tumors of the spine is limited, but is important in planning rehabilitation after surgery. Aims of this study were to assess the preoperative levels and improvement after surgery of these factors, and to identify the predictors of postoperative pain and QOL. Methods: Patients with primary tumors undergoing spine surgery were matched for sex and age with patients with metastatic tumors. QOL was measured at baseline and three months after surgery with the physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) components SF-12 subscales, pain intensity with a numeric rating scale (NRS), depression with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Preoperative SF-12, NRS, and BDI levels and differences in follow-up improvement in SF-12 and NRS were compared across samples. LASSO regressions were performed to find predictors of follow-up SF-12 and NRS. Results: Patients with primary tumors showed better PCS and NRS, and similar BDI and MCS than patients with metastatic tumors. At follow-up, they showed stronger improvement in the MCS and no improvement in the PCS. All QOL scores were below those of the general population. Follow-up PCS was predicted by baseline PCS and BDI; MCS by baseline MCS; pain intensity by baseline pain intensity and BDI. Conclusion: Patients with primary tumors of the spine suffer from moderate levels of physical and mental impairment. Depression influences surgical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

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Spine
Quality of Life
Depression
Psychology
Pain
Equipment and Supplies
Neoplasms
Postoperative Pain
Rehabilitation
Population

Keywords

  • Pain
  • Quality of life
  • Rehabilitation
  • Risk factors
  • Spine tumors
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Quality of life, pain, and psychological factors in patients undergoing surgery for primary tumors of the spine. / Luzzati, Francesca; Giusti, Emanuele Maria; Scotto, Gennaro Maria; Perrucchini, Giuseppe; Cannavò, Luca; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Colonna Cottini, Andrea.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Luzzati, Francesca ; Giusti, Emanuele Maria ; Scotto, Gennaro Maria ; Perrucchini, Giuseppe ; Cannavò, Luca ; Castelnuovo, Gianluca ; Colonna Cottini, Andrea. / Quality of life, pain, and psychological factors in patients undergoing surgery for primary tumors of the spine. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2019.
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abstract = "Purpose: Knowledge about quality of life (QOL), pain, and psychological factors in patients with primary tumors of the spine is limited, but is important in planning rehabilitation after surgery. Aims of this study were to assess the preoperative levels and improvement after surgery of these factors, and to identify the predictors of postoperative pain and QOL. Methods: Patients with primary tumors undergoing spine surgery were matched for sex and age with patients with metastatic tumors. QOL was measured at baseline and three months after surgery with the physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) components SF-12 subscales, pain intensity with a numeric rating scale (NRS), depression with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Preoperative SF-12, NRS, and BDI levels and differences in follow-up improvement in SF-12 and NRS were compared across samples. LASSO regressions were performed to find predictors of follow-up SF-12 and NRS. Results: Patients with primary tumors showed better PCS and NRS, and similar BDI and MCS than patients with metastatic tumors. At follow-up, they showed stronger improvement in the MCS and no improvement in the PCS. All QOL scores were below those of the general population. Follow-up PCS was predicted by baseline PCS and BDI; MCS by baseline MCS; pain intensity by baseline pain intensity and BDI. Conclusion: Patients with primary tumors of the spine suffer from moderate levels of physical and mental impairment. Depression influences surgical outcomes.",
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