Quantification of scatter radiation from radiographic procedures in a neonatal intensive care unit

Mariaconcetta Longo, Elisabetta Genovese, Salvatore Donatiello, Bartolomeo Cassano, Teresa Insero, Mauro Campoleoni, Antonella Del Vecchio, Andrea Magistrelli, Paolo Tomà, Vittorio Cannatà

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), preterm infants are often exposed to a large number of radiographic examinations, which could cause adjacent neonates, family caregivers and staff members to be exposed to a dose amount due to scatter radiation.

OBJECTIVE: To provide information on scatter radiation exposure levels in a NICU, to compare these values with the effective dose limits established by the European Union and to evaluate the effectiveness of radiation protection devices in this setting.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Radiation exposure levels due to scatter radiation were estimated by passive detectors (thermoluminescent dosimeters) and direct dosimetric measurements (with a dose rate meter); in the latter case, an angular map of the scatter dose distribution was achieved.

RESULTS: The dose due to scatter radiation to staff in our setting is approximately 160 μSv/year, which is markedly lower than the effective dose limit for workers established by the European Union (20 mSv/year). The doses range between 0.012 and 0.095 μSv/radiograph. Considering a mean hospitalization period of 3 months and our NICU workload, the corresponding scatter radiation dose to an adjacent patient and/or his/her caregiver is at most 40 μSv.

CONCLUSION: For distances greater than 1 m from the irradiation field, both scatter dose absorbed by a staff member during a year and that by an adjacent patient and/or his/her caregiver during hospitalization is less than 1 mSv, which is the exposure limit for public members in a year.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)715-721
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Radiology
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

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Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Radiation
Caregivers
European Union
Hospitalization
Radiation Protection
Workload
Premature Infants
Newborn Infant
Equipment and Supplies
Radiation Exposure

Keywords

  • Female
  • Hospital Design and Construction
  • Humans
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Premature
  • Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
  • Male
  • Occupational Exposure/analysis
  • Phantoms, Imaging
  • Prospective Studies
  • Radiation Exposure/analysis
  • Radiation Protection/methods
  • Scattering, Radiation
  • Thermoluminescent Dosimetry

Cite this

Quantification of scatter radiation from radiographic procedures in a neonatal intensive care unit. / Longo, Mariaconcetta; Genovese, Elisabetta; Donatiello, Salvatore; Cassano, Bartolomeo; Insero, Teresa; Campoleoni, Mauro; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Magistrelli, Andrea; Tomà, Paolo; Cannatà, Vittorio.

In: Pediatric Radiology, Vol. 48, No. 5, 05.2018, p. 715-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Longo, Mariaconcetta ; Genovese, Elisabetta ; Donatiello, Salvatore ; Cassano, Bartolomeo ; Insero, Teresa ; Campoleoni, Mauro ; Del Vecchio, Antonella ; Magistrelli, Andrea ; Tomà, Paolo ; Cannatà, Vittorio. / Quantification of scatter radiation from radiographic procedures in a neonatal intensive care unit. In: Pediatric Radiology. 2018 ; Vol. 48, No. 5. pp. 715-721.
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T1 - Quantification of scatter radiation from radiographic procedures in a neonatal intensive care unit

AU - Longo, Mariaconcetta

AU - Genovese, Elisabetta

AU - Donatiello, Salvatore

AU - Cassano, Bartolomeo

AU - Insero, Teresa

AU - Campoleoni, Mauro

AU - Del Vecchio, Antonella

AU - Magistrelli, Andrea

AU - Tomà, Paolo

AU - Cannatà, Vittorio

PY - 2018/5

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N2 - BACKGROUND: In a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), preterm infants are often exposed to a large number of radiographic examinations, which could cause adjacent neonates, family caregivers and staff members to be exposed to a dose amount due to scatter radiation.OBJECTIVE: To provide information on scatter radiation exposure levels in a NICU, to compare these values with the effective dose limits established by the European Union and to evaluate the effectiveness of radiation protection devices in this setting.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Radiation exposure levels due to scatter radiation were estimated by passive detectors (thermoluminescent dosimeters) and direct dosimetric measurements (with a dose rate meter); in the latter case, an angular map of the scatter dose distribution was achieved.RESULTS: The dose due to scatter radiation to staff in our setting is approximately 160 μSv/year, which is markedly lower than the effective dose limit for workers established by the European Union (20 mSv/year). The doses range between 0.012 and 0.095 μSv/radiograph. Considering a mean hospitalization period of 3 months and our NICU workload, the corresponding scatter radiation dose to an adjacent patient and/or his/her caregiver is at most 40 μSv.CONCLUSION: For distances greater than 1 m from the irradiation field, both scatter dose absorbed by a staff member during a year and that by an adjacent patient and/or his/her caregiver during hospitalization is less than 1 mSv, which is the exposure limit for public members in a year.

AB - BACKGROUND: In a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), preterm infants are often exposed to a large number of radiographic examinations, which could cause adjacent neonates, family caregivers and staff members to be exposed to a dose amount due to scatter radiation.OBJECTIVE: To provide information on scatter radiation exposure levels in a NICU, to compare these values with the effective dose limits established by the European Union and to evaluate the effectiveness of radiation protection devices in this setting.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Radiation exposure levels due to scatter radiation were estimated by passive detectors (thermoluminescent dosimeters) and direct dosimetric measurements (with a dose rate meter); in the latter case, an angular map of the scatter dose distribution was achieved.RESULTS: The dose due to scatter radiation to staff in our setting is approximately 160 μSv/year, which is markedly lower than the effective dose limit for workers established by the European Union (20 mSv/year). The doses range between 0.012 and 0.095 μSv/radiograph. Considering a mean hospitalization period of 3 months and our NICU workload, the corresponding scatter radiation dose to an adjacent patient and/or his/her caregiver is at most 40 μSv.CONCLUSION: For distances greater than 1 m from the irradiation field, both scatter dose absorbed by a staff member during a year and that by an adjacent patient and/or his/her caregiver during hospitalization is less than 1 mSv, which is the exposure limit for public members in a year.

KW - Female

KW - Hospital Design and Construction

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KW - Infant, Newborn

KW - Infant, Premature

KW - Intensive Care Units, Neonatal

KW - Male

KW - Occupational Exposure/analysis

KW - Phantoms, Imaging

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Radiation Exposure/analysis

KW - Radiation Protection/methods

KW - Scattering, Radiation

KW - Thermoluminescent Dosimetry

U2 - 10.1007/s00247-018-4081-4

DO - 10.1007/s00247-018-4081-4

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C2 - 29442153

VL - 48

SP - 715

EP - 721

JO - Pediatric Radiology

JF - Pediatric Radiology

SN - 0301-0449

IS - 5

ER -