Quantitative brain MRI lesion load predicts the course of clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of multiple sclerosis

M. Filippi, M. A. Horsfield, S. P. Morrissey, D. G. MacManus, P. Rudge, W. I. Mc Donald, David H. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We performed semiautomated quantitative measurement of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities seen at presentation and at 5-year follow-up in 84 patients presenting with an acute clinically isolated syndrome of the optic nerves, brainstem, or spinal cord suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS). At follow-up, 34 (40%) had developed clinically definite and four (5%) clinically probable MS. Patients who developed MS during follow-up had a higher lesion load at presentation than those who did not. There was a strong correlation of the MRI lesion load at presentation with both the increase in lesion load over the next 5 years and disability at follow-up. Increasing initial lesion load correlated with a decreasing time to development of MS clinically (r = −0.328, p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)635-641
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology
Volume44
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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