Radial glial cells as neuronal precursors: A new perspective on the correlation of morphology and lineage restriction in the developing cerebral cortex of mice

Magdalena Götz, Eva Hartfuss, Paolo Malatesta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Radial glia is a ubiquitous cell type in the developing central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates, characterized by radial processes extending through the wall of the neural tube which serve as guiding cables for migrating neurons. Radial glial cells were considered as glial precursor cells due to their astroglial traits and later transformation into astrocytes in the mammalian CNS. Accordingly, a hypothetical morphologically distinct type of precursor was attributed the role of neurogenesis. Recent evidence obtained in vitro and in vivo, however, revealed that a large subset of radial glia generates neurons [42,53]. We further demonstrate here that the progeny of radial glial cells does not differ from the progeny of precursors labeled from the ventricular surface, implying that there is no obvious relation between precursor morphology and neuron-glia lineage decisions in the developing cerebral cortex of mice. Moreover, we show that many radial glial cells seem to maintain their process during cell division and discuss the implications of this observation for the orientation of cell division. These new data are then related to radial glial cells in other non-mammalian vertebrates persisting into adulthood and suggest that radial glia are not only neurogenic during development, but also in adulthood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)777-788
Number of pages12
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Asymmetric cell division
  • Cell fate
  • Cell lineage
  • Mitosis
  • Neurogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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