Radiation therapy rather than prior surgery reduces extent of resection during endonasal endoscopic reoperation for craniopharyngioma

Iyan Younus, Jonathan A. Forbes, Edgar G. Ordóñez-Rubiano, Rafael Avendano-Pradel, Emanuele la Corte, Vijay K. Anand, Theodore H. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Radiation therapy is often advocated for residual or recurrent craniopharyngioma following surgical resection to prevent local recurrence. However, radiation therapy is not always effective and may render tumors more difficult to remove. If this is the case, patients may benefit more from reoperation if gross total resection can be achieved. Nevertheless, there is little data on the impact of radiation on reoperations for craniopharyngioma. In this study, we sought to analyze whether a history of previous radiation therapy (RT) affected extent of resection in patients with recurrent craniopharyngiomas subsequently treated with reoperation via endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA). Methods: The authors reviewed a prospectively acquired database of EEA reoperations of craniopharyngiomas over 13 years at Weill Cornell, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. All procedures were performed by the senior author. The operations were separated into two groups based on whether the patient had surgery alone (group A) or surgery and RT (group B) prior to recurrence. Results: A total of 24 patients (16 male, 8 female) who underwent surgery for recurrent craniopharyngioma were identified. The average time to recurrence was 7.64 ± 4.34 months (range 3–16 months) for group A and 16.62 ± 12.1 months (range 6–45 months) for group B (p < 0.05). The average tumor size at recurrence was smaller in group A (1.85 ± 0.72 cm; range 0.5–3.2) than group B (2.59 ± 0.91 cm; range 1.5–4.6; p = 0.00017). Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 91% (10/11) of patients in group A and 54% (7/13) of patients in group B (p = 0.047). There was a near significant trend for higher average Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score at last follow-up for group A (83 ± 10.6) compared with group B (70 ± 16.3, p = 0.056). Conclusions: While RT for residual or recurrent craniopharyngioma may delay time to recurrence, ability to achieve GTR with additional surgery is reduced. In the case of recurrent craniopharyngioma, if GTR can be achieved, consideration should be given to endonasal reoperation prior to the decision to irradiate residual or recurrent tumor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalActa Neurochirurgica
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - May 25 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Craniopharyngioma
  • Endonasal
  • Endoscope
  • Minimally invasive
  • Oncology
  • Radiation
  • Recurrence
  • Reoperation
  • Skull base

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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