Radiographic evaluation of crestal bone levels of delayed implants at medium-term follow-up.

Giovanni B. Bruschi, Roberto Crespi, Paolo Capparè, Nicola Grande, Ernesto Bruschi, Enrico Gherlone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiographic bone level changes after delayed implant placement at medium-term follow-up, with three elements kept constant: keratinized gingiva thickness, implant axes perpendicular to the opposing occlusal surface, and implants with a collar of 2 mm. Patients treated in a private practice setting were retrospectively enrolled in the study. They underwent delayed placement (4 to 8 weeks after extraction) of dental implants in edentulous premolar or molar regions. Implants followed a delayed loading protocol. Crestal bone levels were measured at baseline; at provisional prosthesis placement; at 1, 3, and 5 years; and at medium-term follow-up of healing from implant placement. One hundred twenty patients received 135 implants (one or two implants per patient); 3 implants were lost. After a mean follow-up period of 9.71 ± 4.88 years, a survival rate of 97.76% was reported. At 1 year after implant placement, mean bone loss of -1.5 ± 0.62 mm was found. At almost 3 years post-implant placement, a mean bone gain of +1.20 ± 0.49 mm was seen, which was statistically significantly different compared with 1 year. After this point, the bone levels remained stable; similar values were reported over time, with no significant differences. The mean vertical bone gain of +1.20 ± 0.49 mm seen at almost 3 years after implant placement in this study may be supported by both clinical parameters as presence of sufficiently thick keratinized gingiva (3 mm), implants with a 2-mm collar, and the axis of implant insertion perpendicular to the opposing occlusal surface.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-447
Number of pages7
JournalThe International journal of oral & maxillofacial implants
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Bone and Bones
Gingiva
Dental Implants
Private Practice
Bicuspid
Prostheses and Implants
Survival Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Radiographic evaluation of crestal bone levels of delayed implants at medium-term follow-up. / Bruschi, Giovanni B.; Crespi, Roberto; Capparè, Paolo; Grande, Nicola; Bruschi, Ernesto; Gherlone, Enrico.

In: The International journal of oral & maxillofacial implants, Vol. 29, No. 2, 2014, p. 441-447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bruschi, Giovanni B. ; Crespi, Roberto ; Capparè, Paolo ; Grande, Nicola ; Bruschi, Ernesto ; Gherlone, Enrico. / Radiographic evaluation of crestal bone levels of delayed implants at medium-term follow-up. In: The International journal of oral & maxillofacial implants. 2014 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 441-447.
@article{f70f377022e44da880acd12bb2bf1534,
title = "Radiographic evaluation of crestal bone levels of delayed implants at medium-term follow-up.",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiographic bone level changes after delayed implant placement at medium-term follow-up, with three elements kept constant: keratinized gingiva thickness, implant axes perpendicular to the opposing occlusal surface, and implants with a collar of 2 mm. Patients treated in a private practice setting were retrospectively enrolled in the study. They underwent delayed placement (4 to 8 weeks after extraction) of dental implants in edentulous premolar or molar regions. Implants followed a delayed loading protocol. Crestal bone levels were measured at baseline; at provisional prosthesis placement; at 1, 3, and 5 years; and at medium-term follow-up of healing from implant placement. One hundred twenty patients received 135 implants (one or two implants per patient); 3 implants were lost. After a mean follow-up period of 9.71 ± 4.88 years, a survival rate of 97.76{\%} was reported. At 1 year after implant placement, mean bone loss of -1.5 ± 0.62 mm was found. At almost 3 years post-implant placement, a mean bone gain of +1.20 ± 0.49 mm was seen, which was statistically significantly different compared with 1 year. After this point, the bone levels remained stable; similar values were reported over time, with no significant differences. The mean vertical bone gain of +1.20 ± 0.49 mm seen at almost 3 years after implant placement in this study may be supported by both clinical parameters as presence of sufficiently thick keratinized gingiva (3 mm), implants with a 2-mm collar, and the axis of implant insertion perpendicular to the opposing occlusal surface.",
author = "Bruschi, {Giovanni B.} and Roberto Crespi and Paolo Cappar{\`e} and Nicola Grande and Ernesto Bruschi and Enrico Gherlone",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.11607/jomi.3254",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "441--447",
journal = "International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants",
issn = "0882-2786",
publisher = "Quintessence Publishing Company",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Radiographic evaluation of crestal bone levels of delayed implants at medium-term follow-up.

AU - Bruschi, Giovanni B.

AU - Crespi, Roberto

AU - Capparè, Paolo

AU - Grande, Nicola

AU - Bruschi, Ernesto

AU - Gherlone, Enrico

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiographic bone level changes after delayed implant placement at medium-term follow-up, with three elements kept constant: keratinized gingiva thickness, implant axes perpendicular to the opposing occlusal surface, and implants with a collar of 2 mm. Patients treated in a private practice setting were retrospectively enrolled in the study. They underwent delayed placement (4 to 8 weeks after extraction) of dental implants in edentulous premolar or molar regions. Implants followed a delayed loading protocol. Crestal bone levels were measured at baseline; at provisional prosthesis placement; at 1, 3, and 5 years; and at medium-term follow-up of healing from implant placement. One hundred twenty patients received 135 implants (one or two implants per patient); 3 implants were lost. After a mean follow-up period of 9.71 ± 4.88 years, a survival rate of 97.76% was reported. At 1 year after implant placement, mean bone loss of -1.5 ± 0.62 mm was found. At almost 3 years post-implant placement, a mean bone gain of +1.20 ± 0.49 mm was seen, which was statistically significantly different compared with 1 year. After this point, the bone levels remained stable; similar values were reported over time, with no significant differences. The mean vertical bone gain of +1.20 ± 0.49 mm seen at almost 3 years after implant placement in this study may be supported by both clinical parameters as presence of sufficiently thick keratinized gingiva (3 mm), implants with a 2-mm collar, and the axis of implant insertion perpendicular to the opposing occlusal surface.

AB - The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiographic bone level changes after delayed implant placement at medium-term follow-up, with three elements kept constant: keratinized gingiva thickness, implant axes perpendicular to the opposing occlusal surface, and implants with a collar of 2 mm. Patients treated in a private practice setting were retrospectively enrolled in the study. They underwent delayed placement (4 to 8 weeks after extraction) of dental implants in edentulous premolar or molar regions. Implants followed a delayed loading protocol. Crestal bone levels were measured at baseline; at provisional prosthesis placement; at 1, 3, and 5 years; and at medium-term follow-up of healing from implant placement. One hundred twenty patients received 135 implants (one or two implants per patient); 3 implants were lost. After a mean follow-up period of 9.71 ± 4.88 years, a survival rate of 97.76% was reported. At 1 year after implant placement, mean bone loss of -1.5 ± 0.62 mm was found. At almost 3 years post-implant placement, a mean bone gain of +1.20 ± 0.49 mm was seen, which was statistically significantly different compared with 1 year. After this point, the bone levels remained stable; similar values were reported over time, with no significant differences. The mean vertical bone gain of +1.20 ± 0.49 mm seen at almost 3 years after implant placement in this study may be supported by both clinical parameters as presence of sufficiently thick keratinized gingiva (3 mm), implants with a 2-mm collar, and the axis of implant insertion perpendicular to the opposing occlusal surface.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84902576295&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84902576295&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.11607/jomi.3254

DO - 10.11607/jomi.3254

M3 - Article

C2 - 24683572

AN - SCOPUS:84902576295

VL - 29

SP - 441

EP - 447

JO - International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants

JF - International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants

SN - 0882-2786

IS - 2

ER -