Radiosurgery for Paragangliomas of the Head and Neck: Another Step for the Validation of a Treatment Paradigm

Marcello Marchetti, Valentina Pinzi, Irene Tramacere, Livia Corinna Bianchi, Francesco Ghielmetti, Laura Fariselli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Background Paragangliomas are highly vascular and predominantly benign neoplasms that traditionally have been treated by surgery, embolization, and/or external beam radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term local tumor control and the safety of radiosurgery for head and neck paragangliomas. Methods Data were obtained from prospectively maintained databases of patients affected by brain tumors treated with radiosurgery at our institution. The inclusion criteria were histologically proven or radiologic-suspected diagnosis of paragangliomas; a follow-up period of at least 12 months, an magnetic resonance imaging–based tumor growth control analysis and a signed written consent. Twenty patients (21 paragangliomas) met the eligibility criteria and were included in the present study. All patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated before and after treatment. Results The mean follow-up at the time of the present analysis was 46 months. Seven patients had a follow-up longer than 60 months. Seven lesions underwent a single-session radiosurgery with a mean dose of 12.2 Gy (range 11–13 Gy). Fourteen lesions underwent multisession radiosurgery with a mean dose of 25.7 Gy (range 20–30 Gy) delivered in 3–5 fractions. The mean tumor volume for single-session radiosurgery was 4 cc (range 1.4–9.2). The mean volume for multisession radiosurgery was 18.9 cc (range 1.3–50.9). None of th e lesions showed progression on radiology during the follow-up period. Neurologic conditions generally are maintained or improved. Conclusions Both single and multisession radiosurgery were confirmed as a safe and effective treatment modality for paragangliomas. Multisession radiosurgery appears effective to treat large lesions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-287
Number of pages7
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume98
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Paraganglioma
Radiosurgery
Neck
Head
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Tumor Burden
Radiology
Brain Neoplasms
Nervous System
Blood Vessels
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Radiotherapy
Databases
Safety
Growth

Keywords

  • CyberKnife
  • Head and neck
  • Hypofraction
  • Paraganglioma
  • Radiosurgery

Cite this

@article{70898efc85b04426b4876932b5abe685,
title = "Radiosurgery for Paragangliomas of the Head and Neck: Another Step for the Validation of a Treatment Paradigm",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 Elsevier Inc. Background Paragangliomas are highly vascular and predominantly benign neoplasms that traditionally have been treated by surgery, embolization, and/or external beam radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term local tumor control and the safety of radiosurgery for head and neck paragangliomas. Methods Data were obtained from prospectively maintained databases of patients affected by brain tumors treated with radiosurgery at our institution. The inclusion criteria were histologically proven or radiologic-suspected diagnosis of paragangliomas; a follow-up period of at least 12 months, an magnetic resonance imaging–based tumor growth control analysis and a signed written consent. Twenty patients (21 paragangliomas) met the eligibility criteria and were included in the present study. All patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated before and after treatment. Results The mean follow-up at the time of the present analysis was 46 months. Seven patients had a follow-up longer than 60 months. Seven lesions underwent a single-session radiosurgery with a mean dose of 12.2 Gy (range 11–13 Gy). Fourteen lesions underwent multisession radiosurgery with a mean dose of 25.7 Gy (range 20–30 Gy) delivered in 3–5 fractions. The mean tumor volume for single-session radiosurgery was 4 cc (range 1.4–9.2). The mean volume for multisession radiosurgery was 18.9 cc (range 1.3–50.9). None of th e lesions showed progression on radiology during the follow-up period. Neurologic conditions generally are maintained or improved. Conclusions Both single and multisession radiosurgery were confirmed as a safe and effective treatment modality for paragangliomas. Multisession radiosurgery appears effective to treat large lesions.",
keywords = "CyberKnife, Head and neck, Hypofraction, Paraganglioma, Radiosurgery",
author = "Marcello Marchetti and Valentina Pinzi and Irene Tramacere and Bianchi, {Livia Corinna} and Francesco Ghielmetti and Laura Fariselli",
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doi = "10.1016/j.wneu.2016.10.132",
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T1 - Radiosurgery for Paragangliomas of the Head and Neck: Another Step for the Validation of a Treatment Paradigm

AU - Marchetti, Marcello

AU - Pinzi, Valentina

AU - Tramacere, Irene

AU - Bianchi, Livia Corinna

AU - Ghielmetti, Francesco

AU - Fariselli, Laura

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - © 2016 Elsevier Inc. Background Paragangliomas are highly vascular and predominantly benign neoplasms that traditionally have been treated by surgery, embolization, and/or external beam radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term local tumor control and the safety of radiosurgery for head and neck paragangliomas. Methods Data were obtained from prospectively maintained databases of patients affected by brain tumors treated with radiosurgery at our institution. The inclusion criteria were histologically proven or radiologic-suspected diagnosis of paragangliomas; a follow-up period of at least 12 months, an magnetic resonance imaging–based tumor growth control analysis and a signed written consent. Twenty patients (21 paragangliomas) met the eligibility criteria and were included in the present study. All patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated before and after treatment. Results The mean follow-up at the time of the present analysis was 46 months. Seven patients had a follow-up longer than 60 months. Seven lesions underwent a single-session radiosurgery with a mean dose of 12.2 Gy (range 11–13 Gy). Fourteen lesions underwent multisession radiosurgery with a mean dose of 25.7 Gy (range 20–30 Gy) delivered in 3–5 fractions. The mean tumor volume for single-session radiosurgery was 4 cc (range 1.4–9.2). The mean volume for multisession radiosurgery was 18.9 cc (range 1.3–50.9). None of th e lesions showed progression on radiology during the follow-up period. Neurologic conditions generally are maintained or improved. Conclusions Both single and multisession radiosurgery were confirmed as a safe and effective treatment modality for paragangliomas. Multisession radiosurgery appears effective to treat large lesions.

AB - © 2016 Elsevier Inc. Background Paragangliomas are highly vascular and predominantly benign neoplasms that traditionally have been treated by surgery, embolization, and/or external beam radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term local tumor control and the safety of radiosurgery for head and neck paragangliomas. Methods Data were obtained from prospectively maintained databases of patients affected by brain tumors treated with radiosurgery at our institution. The inclusion criteria were histologically proven or radiologic-suspected diagnosis of paragangliomas; a follow-up period of at least 12 months, an magnetic resonance imaging–based tumor growth control analysis and a signed written consent. Twenty patients (21 paragangliomas) met the eligibility criteria and were included in the present study. All patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated before and after treatment. Results The mean follow-up at the time of the present analysis was 46 months. Seven patients had a follow-up longer than 60 months. Seven lesions underwent a single-session radiosurgery with a mean dose of 12.2 Gy (range 11–13 Gy). Fourteen lesions underwent multisession radiosurgery with a mean dose of 25.7 Gy (range 20–30 Gy) delivered in 3–5 fractions. The mean tumor volume for single-session radiosurgery was 4 cc (range 1.4–9.2). The mean volume for multisession radiosurgery was 18.9 cc (range 1.3–50.9). None of th e lesions showed progression on radiology during the follow-up period. Neurologic conditions generally are maintained or improved. Conclusions Both single and multisession radiosurgery were confirmed as a safe and effective treatment modality for paragangliomas. Multisession radiosurgery appears effective to treat large lesions.

KW - CyberKnife

KW - Head and neck

KW - Hypofraction

KW - Paraganglioma

KW - Radiosurgery

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