Rarity of microsatellite genomic instability in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in hepatitis C virus-infected patients

Salvatore De Vita, Daniela Gasparotto, Barbara Pivetta, Tamara Vukosavljevic, Vittorina Zagonel, Antonino Carbone, Mauro Boiocchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several groups have emphasized the likely implication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a fraction of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Since only a minority of patients with HCV infection and monoclonal mixed cryoglobulinaemia develop overt lymphoma, the identification of predisposing factors has relevant clinical implications. The replication error phenotype (RER+), as revealed by widespread microsatellite instability, is caused by defects in DNA mismatch repair genes, and has been frequently disclosed in subsets of B-cell lymphomas with underlying infection and chronic inflammation. We therefore investigated the occurrence of the RER+ phenotype in a series of eight consecutive B-cell NHLs in patients with chronic infection by HCV. A polymerase chain reaction-based assay was used to analyse all extended panel of 15 microsatellite loci. Microsatellite instability was not observed in six turnout samples in any locus; the two remaining cases showed instability at only one locus. Therefore genetic instability by defects in DNA mismatch repair genes should not represent the general mechanism predisposing to overt lymphoma in HCV-infected patients. Although a clearer definition of HCV-related B-cell disorders should better address future studies on genetic instability in larger series, we recommend additional ontogenetic pathways as the target of further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)463-465
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume97
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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Microsatellite Instability
Genomic Instability
B-Cell Lymphoma
Hepacivirus
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
DNA Mismatch Repair
Lymphoma
B-Lymphocytes
Cryoglobulinemia
Chronic Hepatitis C
Virus Diseases
Infection
Causality
Microsatellite Repeats
Genes
Inflammation
Phenotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research

Keywords

  • genomic instability
  • HCV
  • lymphoma
  • microsatellite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

De Vita, S., Gasparotto, D., Pivetta, B., Vukosavljevic, T., Zagonel, V., Carbone, A., & Boiocchi, M. (1997). Rarity of microsatellite genomic instability in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in hepatitis C virus-infected patients. British Journal of Haematology, 97(2), 463-465.

Rarity of microsatellite genomic instability in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in hepatitis C virus-infected patients. / De Vita, Salvatore; Gasparotto, Daniela; Pivetta, Barbara; Vukosavljevic, Tamara; Zagonel, Vittorina; Carbone, Antonino; Boiocchi, Mauro.

In: British Journal of Haematology, Vol. 97, No. 2, 1997, p. 463-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Vita, S, Gasparotto, D, Pivetta, B, Vukosavljevic, T, Zagonel, V, Carbone, A & Boiocchi, M 1997, 'Rarity of microsatellite genomic instability in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in hepatitis C virus-infected patients', British Journal of Haematology, vol. 97, no. 2, pp. 463-465.
De Vita, Salvatore ; Gasparotto, Daniela ; Pivetta, Barbara ; Vukosavljevic, Tamara ; Zagonel, Vittorina ; Carbone, Antonino ; Boiocchi, Mauro. / Rarity of microsatellite genomic instability in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in hepatitis C virus-infected patients. In: British Journal of Haematology. 1997 ; Vol. 97, No. 2. pp. 463-465.
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