Recent advances in antiphospholipid antibodies and antiphospholipid syndromes in pediatric populations

T. Avčin, R. Cimaz, Pier Luigi Meroni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and their associated clinical features have been recognized increasingly in various pediatric autoimmune and non-autoimmune diseases. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) appear to be the same as in adults. However, since pediatric patients do not have prothrombotic risk factors present in adults, there clearly are differences in the spectrum of clinical findings. The frequency of aPL-related thrombotic events is generally low in pediatric populations. On the other hand, various commonly acquired infections are likely to be responsible for higher percentage of non-pathogenic and transient aPL in childhood. Such points have to be considered in clinical judgment of elevated aPL in children. In this review we summarize the recent data on the prevalence and clinical significance of aPL in neonates, children and adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-10
Number of pages7
JournalLupus
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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Antiphospholipid Antibodies
Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Pediatrics
Population
Newborn Infant
Infection

Keywords

  • Antiphospholipid antibodies
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome
  • Childhood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Recent advances in antiphospholipid antibodies and antiphospholipid syndromes in pediatric populations. / Avčin, T.; Cimaz, R.; Meroni, Pier Luigi.

In: Lupus, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2002, p. 4-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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