Recognition of positive and negative bandpass-filtered images.

T. Hayes, M. C. Morrone, D. C. Burr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A study is reported in which the significance for vision of low- and high-spatial-frequency components of photographic positive and negative images was investigated by measuring recognition of bandpass-filtered photographs of faces. The results show that a 1.5 octave bandpass-filtered image contains sufficient visual information for good recognition performance, provided the filter is centred close to 20 cycles facewidth-1. At low spatial frequencies negatives are more difficult to recognize than positives, but at high spatial frequencies there is no difference in recognition, implying that it is the low-frequency components of negatives which present difficulties for the visual system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)595-602
Number of pages8
JournalPerception
Volume15
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1986

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Low Vision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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Recognition of positive and negative bandpass-filtered images. / Hayes, T.; Morrone, M. C.; Burr, D. C.

In: Perception, Vol. 15, No. 5, 1986, p. 595-602.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hayes, T, Morrone, MC & Burr, DC 1986, 'Recognition of positive and negative bandpass-filtered images.', Perception, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 595-602.
Hayes, T. ; Morrone, M. C. ; Burr, D. C. / Recognition of positive and negative bandpass-filtered images. In: Perception. 1986 ; Vol. 15, No. 5. pp. 595-602.
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