Recruitment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human primary fibroblasts into experimental tumors growing in SCID mice

Valeria Roni, Walter Habeler, Anna Parenti, Stefano Indraccolo, Eleonora Gola, Valeria Tosello, Roberta Cortivo, Giovanni Abatangelo, Luigi Chieco-Bianchi, Alberto Amadori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Generation of a vascular network is a hallmark of solid tumor growth, and attempts to switch off the tumor angiogenic phenotype are promising. However, this angiogenic potential might also be exploited to obtain incorporation into tumor vessels of genetically modified third-party cells, which could behave as targets of immunologic or pharmacologic attack. With this in mind, we addressed the efficiency and selectivity of third-party cell recruitment into experimental tumors generated in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. The animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with human ovarian carcinoma cell lines and with β-galactosidase (β-gal)-transduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) or human fibroblasts. Transgenic HUVEC were scattered in tumors, but not in normal mouse tissues; immunohistochemical analysis revealed their selective homing to tumor vascular structures, over 50% of which contained β-gal+ cells. Injection of β-gal-transduced human fibroblasts was also associated with transgenic cell incorporation into tumor masses; however, β-gal+ fibroblasts did not home to tumor blood vessels and were only localized within the tumor stroma. These findings show that the recruitment of primary third-party cells into the different compartments of experimentally induced tumors is an efficient and selective phenomenon and indicate possible alternative ways of confronting the tumor angiogenic potential in cancer therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-38
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental Cell Research
Volume287
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2003

Fingerprint

SCID Mice
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells
Fibroblasts
Neoplasms
Blood Vessels
Galactosidases
Vascular Tissue Neoplasms
Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
Carcinoma
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Fibroblasts
  • Homing
  • HUVEC
  • SCID
  • Tumors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Recruitment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human primary fibroblasts into experimental tumors growing in SCID mice. / Roni, Valeria; Habeler, Walter; Parenti, Anna; Indraccolo, Stefano; Gola, Eleonora; Tosello, Valeria; Cortivo, Roberta; Abatangelo, Giovanni; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Amadori, Alberto.

In: Experimental Cell Research, Vol. 287, No. 1, 01.07.2003, p. 28-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roni, Valeria ; Habeler, Walter ; Parenti, Anna ; Indraccolo, Stefano ; Gola, Eleonora ; Tosello, Valeria ; Cortivo, Roberta ; Abatangelo, Giovanni ; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi ; Amadori, Alberto. / Recruitment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human primary fibroblasts into experimental tumors growing in SCID mice. In: Experimental Cell Research. 2003 ; Vol. 287, No. 1. pp. 28-38.
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