Red flags for appropriate referral to the gastroenterologist and the rheumatologist of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and spondyloarthritis

Italian SpA-IBD Expert Panel Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Collaboration between gastroenterologists and rheumatologists is recommended for the correct management of patients with associated spondyloarthritis (SpA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to establish the appropriateness of several red flags for a prompt specialist referral. A systematic review of the literature was performed using the GRADE method to describe the prevalence of co-existing IBD-SpA and the diagnostic accuracy of red flags proposed by a steering committee. Then, a consensus among expert gastroenterologists and rheumatologists (10 in the steering committee and 13 in the expert panel) was obtained using the RAND method to confirm the appropriateness of each red flag as 'major' (one sufficient for patient referral) or 'minor' (at least three needed for patient referral) criteria for specialist referral. The review of the literature confirmed the high prevalence of co-existing IBD-SpA. Positive and negative predictive values of red flags were not calculated, given the lack of available data. A consensus among gastroenterology and rheumatology specialists was used to confirm the appropriateness of each red flag. Major criteria to refer patients with SpA to the gastroenterologist included: rectal bleeding, chronic abdominal pain, perianal fistula or abscess, chronic diarrhoea and nocturnal symptoms. Major criteria to refer patients with IBD to the rheumatologist included: chronic low back pain, dactylitis, enthesitis and pain/swelling of peripheral joints. Several major and minor red flags have been identified for the diagnosis of co-existing IBD-SpA. The use of red flags in routine clinical practice may avoid diagnostic delay and reduce clinic overload.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical and Experimental Immunology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Dec 15 2018

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Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Referral and Consultation
Consensus
Rheumatology
Gastroenterology
Low Back Pain
Chronic Pain
Abscess
Abdominal Pain
Fistula
Diarrhea
Joints
Rheumatologists
Gastroenterologists
Hemorrhage
Pain

Cite this

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title = "Red flags for appropriate referral to the gastroenterologist and the rheumatologist of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and spondyloarthritis",
abstract = "Collaboration between gastroenterologists and rheumatologists is recommended for the correct management of patients with associated spondyloarthritis (SpA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to establish the appropriateness of several red flags for a prompt specialist referral. A systematic review of the literature was performed using the GRADE method to describe the prevalence of co-existing IBD-SpA and the diagnostic accuracy of red flags proposed by a steering committee. Then, a consensus among expert gastroenterologists and rheumatologists (10 in the steering committee and 13 in the expert panel) was obtained using the RAND method to confirm the appropriateness of each red flag as 'major' (one sufficient for patient referral) or 'minor' (at least three needed for patient referral) criteria for specialist referral. The review of the literature confirmed the high prevalence of co-existing IBD-SpA. Positive and negative predictive values of red flags were not calculated, given the lack of available data. A consensus among gastroenterology and rheumatology specialists was used to confirm the appropriateness of each red flag. Major criteria to refer patients with SpA to the gastroenterologist included: rectal bleeding, chronic abdominal pain, perianal fistula or abscess, chronic diarrhoea and nocturnal symptoms. Major criteria to refer patients with IBD to the rheumatologist included: chronic low back pain, dactylitis, enthesitis and pain/swelling of peripheral joints. Several major and minor red flags have been identified for the diagnosis of co-existing IBD-SpA. The use of red flags in routine clinical practice may avoid diagnostic delay and reduce clinic overload.",
author = "{Italian SpA-IBD Expert Panel Group} and C Felice and P Leccese and L Scudeller and E Lubrano and F Cantini and F Castiglione and P Gionchetti and A Orlando and C Salvarani and R Scarpa and M Vecchi and I Olivieri and A Armuzzi",
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year = "2018",
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T1 - Red flags for appropriate referral to the gastroenterologist and the rheumatologist of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and spondyloarthritis

AU - Italian SpA-IBD Expert Panel Group

AU - Felice, C

AU - Leccese, P

AU - Scudeller, L

AU - Lubrano, E

AU - Cantini, F

AU - Castiglione, F

AU - Gionchetti, P

AU - Orlando, A

AU - Salvarani, C

AU - Scarpa, R

AU - Vecchi, M

AU - Olivieri, I

AU - Armuzzi, A

N1 - © 2018 British Society for Immunology.

PY - 2018/12/15

Y1 - 2018/12/15

N2 - Collaboration between gastroenterologists and rheumatologists is recommended for the correct management of patients with associated spondyloarthritis (SpA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to establish the appropriateness of several red flags for a prompt specialist referral. A systematic review of the literature was performed using the GRADE method to describe the prevalence of co-existing IBD-SpA and the diagnostic accuracy of red flags proposed by a steering committee. Then, a consensus among expert gastroenterologists and rheumatologists (10 in the steering committee and 13 in the expert panel) was obtained using the RAND method to confirm the appropriateness of each red flag as 'major' (one sufficient for patient referral) or 'minor' (at least three needed for patient referral) criteria for specialist referral. The review of the literature confirmed the high prevalence of co-existing IBD-SpA. Positive and negative predictive values of red flags were not calculated, given the lack of available data. A consensus among gastroenterology and rheumatology specialists was used to confirm the appropriateness of each red flag. Major criteria to refer patients with SpA to the gastroenterologist included: rectal bleeding, chronic abdominal pain, perianal fistula or abscess, chronic diarrhoea and nocturnal symptoms. Major criteria to refer patients with IBD to the rheumatologist included: chronic low back pain, dactylitis, enthesitis and pain/swelling of peripheral joints. Several major and minor red flags have been identified for the diagnosis of co-existing IBD-SpA. The use of red flags in routine clinical practice may avoid diagnostic delay and reduce clinic overload.

AB - Collaboration between gastroenterologists and rheumatologists is recommended for the correct management of patients with associated spondyloarthritis (SpA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to establish the appropriateness of several red flags for a prompt specialist referral. A systematic review of the literature was performed using the GRADE method to describe the prevalence of co-existing IBD-SpA and the diagnostic accuracy of red flags proposed by a steering committee. Then, a consensus among expert gastroenterologists and rheumatologists (10 in the steering committee and 13 in the expert panel) was obtained using the RAND method to confirm the appropriateness of each red flag as 'major' (one sufficient for patient referral) or 'minor' (at least three needed for patient referral) criteria for specialist referral. The review of the literature confirmed the high prevalence of co-existing IBD-SpA. Positive and negative predictive values of red flags were not calculated, given the lack of available data. A consensus among gastroenterology and rheumatology specialists was used to confirm the appropriateness of each red flag. Major criteria to refer patients with SpA to the gastroenterologist included: rectal bleeding, chronic abdominal pain, perianal fistula or abscess, chronic diarrhoea and nocturnal symptoms. Major criteria to refer patients with IBD to the rheumatologist included: chronic low back pain, dactylitis, enthesitis and pain/swelling of peripheral joints. Several major and minor red flags have been identified for the diagnosis of co-existing IBD-SpA. The use of red flags in routine clinical practice may avoid diagnostic delay and reduce clinic overload.

U2 - 10.1111/cei.13246

DO - 10.1111/cei.13246

M3 - Article

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JO - Clinical and Experimental Immunology

JF - Clinical and Experimental Immunology

SN - 0009-9104

ER -