Reduced density of dopamine D2-like receptors on peripheral blood lymphocytes in Alzheimer's disease

Piero Barbanti, Giovanni Fabbrini, Alberto Ricci, Giuseppe Bruno, Rosanna Cerbo, Elena Bronzetti, Francesco Amenta, Gian Luigi Lenzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Clinical and pathological evidence points to an involvement of dopamine in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was designed to assay dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptors on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in 20 patients with AD and in 25 healthy controls by radioligand binding assay techniques with [3H][R]-(+)-(-)chloro-2,3,4,5 tetrahydro-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepin-al-hemimaleate (SCH 23390) and [3H]7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetraline (7OH-DPAT) as radioligands. The density of dopamine D1-like receptors and the affinity of [3H]SCH 23390 and [3H]7OH-DPAT binding to PBL were similar in both groups investigated. AD patients revealed a lower density of dopamine D2-like receptors on PBL than controls (P=0.0016). The pharmacological profile of [3H]SCH 23390 and [3H]7OH-DPAT binding to PBL was consistent with the labeling of dopamine D5 and D3 receptor subtypes, respectively. The reduced density of dopamine D2-like receptors on PBL is consistent with the observation of changes in the expression of D2-like receptors in dopaminergic brain areas in AD. Our findings support the hypothesis of an involvement of dopamine in AD, even in those patients with no evidence of Parkinsonism, behavioral abnormalities or psychosis. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-75
Number of pages11
JournalMechanisms of Ageing and Development
Volume120
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2000

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Dopamine receptors
  • Lymphocyte
  • Radioligand binding assay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Biochemistry
  • Developmental Biology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

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