Region- and neurotransmitter-dependent species and strain differences in DSP-4-induced monoamine depletion in rodents

Francesco Fornai, Lucia Bassi, Maria Tilde Torracca, Maria Grazia Alessandrì, Vera Scalori, Giovanni U. Corsini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The neurotoxin N-(-2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzyl (DSP-4) is commonly used as a chemical tool to induce selective denervation of noradrenergic terminals arising from the locus coeruleus and to study the molecular mechanisms underlying degeneration of central noradrenergic axons in rodents. Monoamine depletion in different rodent species after DSP-4 is generally assumed to occur with a similar pattern. To verify this assumption, in the present study we evaluated the different patterns of monoamine depletion produced by DSP-4 in different brain regions of two different strains of mice and rats 3, 7 and 14 days after DSP-4 administration. In this report, we show that there are evident species and strain differences concerning the pattern of norepinephrine depletion in various brain regions. Moreover, serotonin levels are fully preserved following DSP-4 in mice, whereas there is a significant serotonin decrease in specific brain regions after the same dose of DSP-4 in rats. Apart from disclosing species and strain variability among rodents in neurotoxin-induced monoamine depletion, these findings suggest that DSP-4 should be considered as a different neurotoxin, depending on the species and strain in which it is administered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-249
Number of pages9
JournalNeurodegeneration
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1996

Keywords

  • DSP-4
  • Locus coeruleus
  • Noradrenergic terminals
  • Norepinephrine
  • Serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Region- and neurotransmitter-dependent species and strain differences in DSP-4-induced monoamine depletion in rodents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this