Regulatory and logistical issues influencing access to antineoplastic and supportive care medications for children with cancer in developing countries

John T. Wiernikowski, Stuart Macleod, R. Barr, M. Casanova, A. Denburg, L. Frazier, E. Grynszpancholc, A. Kienesberger, S. MacLeod, D. McGoldrick, S. Petrilli, R. Rousseau, K. Weerasuriya, J. Wiernikowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Globally there are numerous impediments, both logistical, regulatory and more recently global drug shortages, hindering pediatric access to therapeutic drugs of all types. Efforts to reduce barriers are ongoing and are especially important in low and middle income countries and for children requiring treatment of conditions such as those encountered in pediatric oncology characterized by the risk of life threatening treatment failures. Progress has been made through the efforts of the World Health Organization and regulators in the US and Europe to encourage the development of therapeutic agents for use in pediatrics and measures taken have fostered the availability of stronger pediatric data to guide therapeutic decisions. Nonetheless, pharmaceuticals remain a global commodity, subject to regulation by the World Trade Organization and this has often had detrimental effects in low and middle income countries. This article emphasizes the need for closer international collaboration to address the barriers currently impeding access to antineoplastic and supportive care medicines for children. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2014; 61:1513-1517.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1513-1517
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume61
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Cancer pharmacology
  • Drug access
  • Low/middle income countries
  • Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology

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