Regulatory T cells in obesity: the leptin connection

Giuseppe Matarese, Claudio Procaccini, Veronica De Rosa, Tamas L. Horvath, Antonio La Cava

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies to understand the pathogenesis of obesity have revealed mediators that are responsible for the control of food intake and metabolism at the hypothalamic level. However, molecular insight explaining the link between obesity and low-degree chronic inflammation remains elusive. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin, and thereby the nutritional status, could control immune self-tolerance by affecting regulatory T (Treg) cell responsiveness and function. Furthermore, resident Treg cells, which are capable of modulating metabolism and glucose homeostasis, are abundant in adipose tissue. Here, we provide an update on recent findings relating Treg cells to obesity and discuss how the intricate network of interactions among leptin, Treg cells and adipose tissue might provide new strategies for therapeutic interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-256
Number of pages10
JournalTrends in Molecular Medicine
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

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Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Leptin
Obesity
Adipose Tissue
Self Tolerance
Immune Tolerance
Nutritional Status
Adipocytes
Homeostasis
Eating
Hormones
Inflammation
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Matarese, G., Procaccini, C., De Rosa, V., Horvath, T. L., & La Cava, A. (2010). Regulatory T cells in obesity: the leptin connection. Trends in Molecular Medicine, 16(6), 247-256. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmed.2010.04.002

Regulatory T cells in obesity : the leptin connection. / Matarese, Giuseppe; Procaccini, Claudio; De Rosa, Veronica; Horvath, Tamas L.; La Cava, Antonio.

In: Trends in Molecular Medicine, Vol. 16, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 247-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matarese, G, Procaccini, C, De Rosa, V, Horvath, TL & La Cava, A 2010, 'Regulatory T cells in obesity: the leptin connection', Trends in Molecular Medicine, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 247-256. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmed.2010.04.002
Matarese G, Procaccini C, De Rosa V, Horvath TL, La Cava A. Regulatory T cells in obesity: the leptin connection. Trends in Molecular Medicine. 2010 Jun;16(6):247-256. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmed.2010.04.002
Matarese, Giuseppe ; Procaccini, Claudio ; De Rosa, Veronica ; Horvath, Tamas L. ; La Cava, Antonio. / Regulatory T cells in obesity : the leptin connection. In: Trends in Molecular Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 247-256.
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