Relationship between Prolactin Plasma Levels and White Matter Volume in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

L. De Giglio, F. Marinelli, L. Prosperini, G. M. Contessa, F. Gurreri, M. C. Piattella, F. De Angelis, V. T. Barletta, V. Tomassini, P. Pantano, C. Pozzilli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background. The role of prolactin (PRL) on tissue injury and repair mechanisms in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unclear. The aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between PRL plasma levels and brain damage as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods. We employed a chemiluminescence immunoassay for measuring plasma levels of PRL. We used a 1.5 T scanner to acquire images and Jim 4.0 and SIENAX software to analyse them. Results. We included 106 women with relapsing remitting (RR) MS and stable disease in the last two months. There was no difference in PRL plasma levels between patients with and without gadolinium enhancement on MRI. PRL plasma levels correlated with white matter volume (WMV) (rho = 0.284, p=0.014) but not with grey matter volume (GMV). Moreover, PRL levels predicted changes in WMV (Beta: 984, p=0.034). Conclusions. Our data of a positive association between PRL serum levels and WMV support the role of PRL in promoting myelin repair as documented in animal models of demyelination. The lack of an increase of PRL in the presence of gadolinium enhancement, contrasts with the view considering this hormone as an immune-stimulating and detrimental factor in the inflammatory process associated with MS.

Original languageEnglish
Article number732539
JournalMediators of Inflammation
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Prolactin
Multiple Sclerosis
Gadolinium
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
White Matter
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Demyelinating Diseases
Myelin Sheath
Luminescence
Immunoassay
Software
Animal Models
Hormones
Wounds and Injuries
Brain
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

De Giglio, L., Marinelli, F., Prosperini, L., Contessa, G. M., Gurreri, F., Piattella, M. C., ... Pozzilli, C. (2015). Relationship between Prolactin Plasma Levels and White Matter Volume in Women with Multiple Sclerosis. Mediators of Inflammation, 2015, [732539]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/732539

Relationship between Prolactin Plasma Levels and White Matter Volume in Women with Multiple Sclerosis. / De Giglio, L.; Marinelli, F.; Prosperini, L.; Contessa, G. M.; Gurreri, F.; Piattella, M. C.; De Angelis, F.; Barletta, V. T.; Tomassini, V.; Pantano, P.; Pozzilli, C.

In: Mediators of Inflammation, Vol. 2015, 732539, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Giglio, L, Marinelli, F, Prosperini, L, Contessa, GM, Gurreri, F, Piattella, MC, De Angelis, F, Barletta, VT, Tomassini, V, Pantano, P & Pozzilli, C 2015, 'Relationship between Prolactin Plasma Levels and White Matter Volume in Women with Multiple Sclerosis', Mediators of Inflammation, vol. 2015, 732539. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/732539
De Giglio, L. ; Marinelli, F. ; Prosperini, L. ; Contessa, G. M. ; Gurreri, F. ; Piattella, M. C. ; De Angelis, F. ; Barletta, V. T. ; Tomassini, V. ; Pantano, P. ; Pozzilli, C. / Relationship between Prolactin Plasma Levels and White Matter Volume in Women with Multiple Sclerosis. In: Mediators of Inflammation. 2015 ; Vol. 2015.
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abstract = "Background. The role of prolactin (PRL) on tissue injury and repair mechanisms in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unclear. The aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between PRL plasma levels and brain damage as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods. We employed a chemiluminescence immunoassay for measuring plasma levels of PRL. We used a 1.5 T scanner to acquire images and Jim 4.0 and SIENAX software to analyse them. Results. We included 106 women with relapsing remitting (RR) MS and stable disease in the last two months. There was no difference in PRL plasma levels between patients with and without gadolinium enhancement on MRI. PRL plasma levels correlated with white matter volume (WMV) (rho = 0.284, p=0.014) but not with grey matter volume (GMV). Moreover, PRL levels predicted changes in WMV (Beta: 984, p=0.034). Conclusions. Our data of a positive association between PRL serum levels and WMV support the role of PRL in promoting myelin repair as documented in animal models of demyelination. The lack of an increase of PRL in the presence of gadolinium enhancement, contrasts with the view considering this hormone as an immune-stimulating and detrimental factor in the inflammatory process associated with MS.",
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AU - Piattella, M. C.

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