Relationship between the miRNA profiles and oncogene mutations in non-smoker lung cancer. Relevance for lung cancer personalized screenings and treatments

Alberto Izzotti, Gabriela Coronel Vargas, Alessandra Pulliero, Simona Coco, Irene Vanni, Cristina Colarossi, Giuseppina Blanco, Antonella Agodi, Martina Barchitta, Andrea Maugeri, Gea Oliveri Conti, Margherita Ferrante, Salvatore Sciacca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Oncogene mutations may be drivers of the carcinogenesis process. MicroRNA (miRNA) alterations may be adaptive or pathogenic and can have consequences only when mutation in the controlled oncogenes occurs. The aim of this research was to analyze the interplay between miRNA expression and oncogene mutation. A total of 2549 miRNAs were analyzed in cancer tissue—in surrounding normal lung tissue collected from 64 non-smoking patients and in blood plasma. Mutations in 92 hotspots of 22 oncogenes were tested in the lung cancer tissue. MicroRNA alterations were related to the mutations occurring in cancer patients. Conversely, the frequency of mutation occurrence was variable and spanned from the k-ras and p53 mutation detected in 30% of patients to 20% of patients in which no mutation was detected. The prediction of survival at a 3-year follow up did not occur for mutation analysis but was, conversely, well evident for miRNA analysis highlighting a pattern of miRNA distinguishing between survivors and death in patients 3 years before this clinical onset. A signature of six lung cancer specific miRNAs occurring both in the lungs and blood was identified. The obtained results provide evidence that the analysis of both miRNA and oncogene mutations was more informative than the oncogene mutation analysis cur-rently performed in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Article number182
JournalJournal of Personalized Medicine
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Environmental risk factors
  • MiRNA
  • Mutations
  • Nonsmokers lung cancer
  • Oncogenes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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