Relationship of chemotherapy-induced necrosis and surgical margins to local recurrence in osteosarcoma

P. Picci, L. Sangiorgi, B. T. Rougraff, J. R. Neff, R. Casadei, M. Campanacci

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Abstract

Purpose and Methods: To assess patients with high-grade osteosarcoma treated at our institution for various prognostic factors for the development of local recurrence of disease. Follow-up data were available for all patients and the mean follow-up duration was 65 months in surviving patients. Results: There were 28 local recurrences in this study (7%). Of these, only three patients (11%) were alive at the most recent follow-up point, 28, 53, and 54 months after local recurrence. None of 59 patients who were treated primarily with a radical amputation and none of 10 who underwent a rotationplasty developed local recurrence. Four of 48 patients (8%) who had wide amputations, one of whom had an intralesional amputation, and 23 of 237 (10%) who had limb-salvage surgery developed locally recurrent disease. Of 237 patients who underwent limb-sparing resection, three prognostic factors for local control were identified. The strongest association with local recurrence was chemotherapy response (P <.0001), followed closely by surgical margins (P = .0001). Older patients were more likely to have locally recurrent disease (P = .033), with each decade of life older than the first decade having a relative risk of 1.5 times greater per decade (SE = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, 0.034 to .0650). Factors that were not associated with local recurrence included sex, date of diagnosis, and anatomic site of disease. Conclusion: Chemotherapy-induced tumor necrosis and surgical margins are important prognostic factors for local control of patients with osteosarcoma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2699-2705
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume12
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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